Issue - meetings

Motions

Meeting: 07/09/2021 - Full Council (Item 11)

11 Motions pdf icon PDF 326 KB

Note:

Under the Council’s constitution, 30 minutes are available for the consideration of motions. In practice, this realistically means that there is usually only time for one, or possibly two motions to be considered.

 

With the agreement of the Lord Mayor, motion 1 below will be considered at this meeting, and motion 2 could be considered, subject to time.

 

Details of other motions submitted, (which, due to time constraints, are very unlikely to be considered at this meeting) are also set out for information.

 

MOTIONS RECEIVED FOR FULL COUNCIL

 

  1. Golden Motion - Protect the Green Belt and Bristol’s Green Spaces

 

This Council welcomes the importance placed by Her Majesty’s Government on the protection of the Green Belt and endorses the main reasons given for preserving this strategic space.

These zones are essential to check urban sprawl; prevent the merging of neighbouring towns; safeguard the countryside from encroachment; preserve the setting and special characteristics of historic areas; and assist in urban regeneration by encouraging the recycling of already developed land. 

The need to conserve the existing Green Belt, as well as retaining vital green spaces, remains a major priority for most people in our city.   As a result, Council notes the Mayor’s recent decision to not now build housing on Brislington Meadows and to ‘look again’ at housing plans which would destroy the Western Slopes wildlife corridor. 

Sadly, there are other equally significant sites which remain under the threat of the bulldozer.  One such place is Yew Tree Farm, Bristol’s last working farm.  The family there has been recognised by the Avon Wildlife Trust and RSPB for the huge strides made in achieving sustainable, low-intensity, organic local food production, whilst maintaining abundant and attractive biodiversity.  

Considering the Mayor’s pledges around combatting food poverty and encouraging communities to grow more of their own food, Council calls for a halt to the proposed redevelopment of or incursion into any remaining productive wildlife rich agricultural land.  Furthermore, the Mayor is asked to give a cast-iron commitment that he will look instead to increase the emphasis placed in the Authority’s Site Allocations and Development Management policies on re-using or re-purposing existing and emerging ‘brownfield’, previously developed or urban centres rather than continuing to erode our surrounding fields and countryside.

Motion to be moved by: Councillor Richard Eddy

2.      Silver Motion - Reduce carbon emissions from new building by 75% immediately

Full Council notes that:  

1.      Bristol City Council declared a Climate Emergency in November 2018 following a Green Motion set out by Carla Denyer.

2.      The motion committed the city to achieve net zero carbon by 2030 and there are now only 9 years left to this target date.

3.      The Council is currently required to implement the Government approved uplift to Part L (power and energy standards) and F (ventilation standards), of the new building regulations in December 2021.

4.      Responses to the Government’s 2020 consultation on the Future Homes Standards made it clear that the Part L uplift proposed for December 2021 was  ...  view the full agenda text for item 11

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Following a short adjournment, it was then moved by the Lord Mayor that standing order CPR2.1(xi) be suspended to allow the meeting to go past the 30 minutes time limit for motions.  Following a vote it was agreed to proceed up until a 45 minute limit for motions and a 9pm finish time for the meeting.

Golden Motion: PROTECT THE GREEN BELT AND BRISTOL’S GREEN SPACES

 

Councillor Eddy moved the following motion:

 

This Council welcomes the importance placed by Her Majesty’s Government on the protection of the Green Belt and endorses the main reasons given for preserving this strategic space.

 

These zones are essential to check urban sprawl; prevent the merging of neighbouring towns; safeguard the countryside from encroachment; preserve the setting and special characteristics of historic areas; and assist in urban regeneration by encouraging the recycling of already developed land.

 

The need to conserve the existing Green Belt, as well as retaining vital green spaces, remains a major priority for most people in our city.   As a result, Council notes the Mayor’s recent decision to not now build housing on Brislington Meadows and to ‘look again’ at housing plans which would destroy the Western Slopes wildlife corridor.

 

Sadly, there are other equally significant sites which remain under the threat of the bulldozer.  One such place is Yew Tree Farm, Bristol’s last working farm.  The family there has been recognised by the Avon Wildlife Trust and RSPB for the huge strides made in achieving sustainable, low-intensity, organic local food production, whilst maintaining abundant and attractive biodiversity. 

 

Considering the Mayor’s pledges around combatting food poverty and encouraging communities to grow more of their own food, Council calls for a halt to the proposed redevelopment of or incursion into any remaining productive wildlife rich agricultural land. 

 

Furthermore, the Mayor is asked to give a cast-iron commitment that he will look instead to increase the emphasis placed in the Authority’s Site Allocations and Development Management policies on re-using or re-purposing existing and emerging ‘brownfield’, previously developed or urban centres rather than continuing to erode our surrounding fields and countryside.

 

The motion was seconded by Councillor Hucker.

 

Councillor Renhard then moved the following amendment:

 

‘That the motion be amended to read as follows:

 

This Council welcomes the importance placed by Her Majesty’s Government on the protection of the Green Belt and endorses the main reasons given for preserving this strategic space.

 

These zones are essential to check urban sprawl; prevent the merging of neighbouring towns; safeguard the countryside from encroachment; preserve the setting and special characteristics of historic areas; and assist in urban regeneration by encouraging the recycling of already developed land.

 

The need to conserve the existing Green Belt, as well as retaining vital green spaces, remains a major priority for most people in our city.   As a result, Council notes the Mayor’s recent decision to not now build housing on Brislington Meadows and to ‘look again’ at housing plans which would destroy the Western Slopes wildlife corridor.

 

Sadly, there are other equally  ...  view the full minutes text for item 11