Agenda item

Motions

Note:

Under the Council’s constitution, 30 minutes are available for the consideration of motions. In practice, this realistically means that there is usually only time for one, or possibly two motions to be considered.

 

With the agreement of the Lord Mayor, motion 1 below will be considered at this meeting, and motion 2 could be considered, subject to time.

 

Details of other motions submitted, (which, due to time constraints, are very unlikely to be considered at this meeting) are also set out for information.

 

MOTIONS RECEIVED FOR FULL COUNCIL

 

  1. Golden Motion - Protect the Green Belt and Bristol’s Green Spaces

 

This Council welcomes the importance placed by Her Majesty’s Government on the protection of the Green Belt and endorses the main reasons given for preserving this strategic space.

These zones are essential to check urban sprawl; prevent the merging of neighbouring towns; safeguard the countryside from encroachment; preserve the setting and special characteristics of historic areas; and assist in urban regeneration by encouraging the recycling of already developed land. 

The need to conserve the existing Green Belt, as well as retaining vital green spaces, remains a major priority for most people in our city.   As a result, Council notes the Mayor’s recent decision to not now build housing on Brislington Meadows and to ‘look again’ at housing plans which would destroy the Western Slopes wildlife corridor. 

Sadly, there are other equally significant sites which remain under the threat of the bulldozer.  One such place is Yew Tree Farm, Bristol’s last working farm.  The family there has been recognised by the Avon Wildlife Trust and RSPB for the huge strides made in achieving sustainable, low-intensity, organic local food production, whilst maintaining abundant and attractive biodiversity.  

Considering the Mayor’s pledges around combatting food poverty and encouraging communities to grow more of their own food, Council calls for a halt to the proposed redevelopment of or incursion into any remaining productive wildlife rich agricultural land.  Furthermore, the Mayor is asked to give a cast-iron commitment that he will look instead to increase the emphasis placed in the Authority’s Site Allocations and Development Management policies on re-using or re-purposing existing and emerging ‘brownfield’, previously developed or urban centres rather than continuing to erode our surrounding fields and countryside.

Motion to be moved by: Councillor Richard Eddy

2.      Silver Motion - Reduce carbon emissions from new building by 75% immediately

Full Council notes that:  

1.      Bristol City Council declared a Climate Emergency in November 2018 following a Green Motion set out by Carla Denyer.

2.      The motion committed the city to achieve net zero carbon by 2030 and there are now only 9 years left to this target date.

3.      The Council is currently required to implement the Government approved uplift to Part L (power and energy standards) and F (ventilation standards), of the new building regulations in December 2021.

4.      Responses to the Government’s 2020 consultation on the Future Homes Standards made it clear that the Part L uplift proposed for December 2021 was insufficient to meet the government’s zero carbon target for 2050, and called for higher standards.

5.      The Council has the capacity and authority to set local energy efficiency standards for new homes as set out in the Planning and Energy Act 2008, and may set them at a higher level than government standards.

 Full Council believes: 

  1. Only implementing the minimum uplift values for Part L (see appendix A) in Dec 2021 for new homes would require further costly retrofitting in the future in order for homes to meet our 2030 carbon targets.
  2. Implementing the building regulation requirements for Part L discussed in the Futures Homes Standards 2025, in December 2021, would enable Bristol to reach our zero carbon targets by 2030.
  3. This would mean that all new homes built after December 2021 would have carbon emissions at least 75% lower than current Building Regulations standards, as opposed to the 31% improvement implied by the Part L uplift, proposed by the government for December 2021.
  4. In order to reach our 2030 emissions targets it would be necessary to apply transitional arrangements to individual buildings already under construction, rather than the whole building site.
  5. It will be necessary to set out a strategic plan to ensure that all buildings are to be built 100% zero carbon from 2025 onwards.

 

Full Council Resolves:

  1. To call on the administration to implement the powers of the Council with respect to the Planning and Energy Act 2008 and apply the full Future Homes Standards as set out for Part L of the Building regulations in December 2021.
  2. That the administration promote all new homes to be built 100% zero carbon from 2025, and that a strategic plan is established in consultation with the members of the building development community.

 

Motion to be moved by: Councillor Lisa Stone

 

Appendix A:

The standards for part L 2021 and the indicative Future Homes Standard can be seen side by side in Table 2 in the government response to consultation found at: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/956094/Government_response_to_Future_Homes_Standard_consultation.pdf

 

References

The Future Homes Standard: 2019 Consultation on changes to Part L (conservation of fuel and power) and Part F (ventilation) of the Building Regulations for new dwellings: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/956094/Government_response_to_Future_Homes_Standard_consultation.pdf

 

Home User Guide BUILDING REGULATIONS PART L, F AND OVERHEATING – ENGLAND: https://www.thenbs.com/PublicationIndex/documents/details?Pub=MHCLG&DocID=331261

 

The Clean Growth Strategy Leading the way to a low carbon future: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/700496/clean-growth-strategy-correction-april-2018.pdf

 

ENERGY WHITE PAPER Powering our Net Zero Future: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/energy-white-paper-powering-our-net-zero-future

 

  1. National Disability Strategy

 

The Council notes:

  • The Government published its long-awaited National Disability Strategy on 28 July.
  • This strategy has been strongly criticised by disabled people and their organisations for not coming up with any solutions for addressing the barriers, issues and priorities that they have identified for years.
  • The lack of engagement with disabled groups has also been strongly criticised and is so severe that the Disabled People’s Organisations Forum are taking the Government to court, as the absence of meaningful consultation could be deemed unlawful.
  • In addition to this, disabled people have been disproportionately affected by the pandemic, as 60% people dying from Covid were disabled, despite disabled people only making up 20% of the population.
  • Disabled people have also borne the brunt of decade-long Government austerity through cuts to the key public services that they rely on and are also over-represented in unemployment figures - particularly those with learning difficulties.
  • The Government is still yet to formulate a solution to the social care crisis, despite the Prime Minister’s pledge to deliver a plan two years ago, which is emblematic of this Government’s lack of support for disabled people.

 

The Council believes:

  • The National Disability Strategy is not fit for purpose and is a tick-box exercise that does nothing to address the issues facing disabled people in Bristol.
  • That disabled people have been routinely ignored by this Government, and their interests need to be prioritised and new resources identified by the Government in its Covid recovery plans.

 

This Council resolves:

  • To call on Party Group Leaders to issue public statements stating that Bristol City Council does not believe the current Strategy is fit for purpose.
  • To call on Party Group Leaders to write to the Government to ask it to formulate a new National Disability Strategy that is co-produced with disabled people and their organisations. This must address how they intend to revise and resource the broken adult care and benefits systems to enable disabled people to contribute to society and to live inclusive and independent lives.

 

Motion to be moved by:  Councillor Helen Holland

 

  1. Afghanistan Motion

 

This Council notes:

 

The US Government’s decision to withdraw all forces from Afghanistan, and subsequently, the decision of other NATO forces to withdraw troops in the same timeframe.

 

The Taliban have a consistent record of war crimes, civilian oppression, and a wide array of human rights abuses.

 

Consequentially, tens of thousands of Afghans have been attempting to flee the country through Kabul airport, which, for the weeks leading up to the withdrawal date, was the only US-controlled territory in Afghanistan.

 

This Council believes:

 

1.       The UK has a duty to civilians in Afghans, and first and foremost, a duty to the Afghan translators who worked alongside the British army in its fight against the Taliban, as well as other staff who supported the military, British Embassy staff and Afghans who supported the wider mission. All these people will be among the first to face persecution.

2.       As a City of Sanctuary, Bristol has a commitment to being a ‘welcoming place of safety for all and proud to offer sanctuary to people fleeing violence and persecution.’

3.       The Government’s current target of resettling 5,000 refugees in the first year and a further 15,000 in total in following years is derisory and needs to be significantly higher.

4.       Considering the date for withdrawal of US forces has now passed, the promise to resettle a further 15,000 is now likely unachievable.

5.       The plight of Afghans fleeing the country was made significantly more difficult by the Foreign Secretary refusing to phone his Afghan counterpart for urgent support, and that he should resign for this moral and professional failing.

6.       The chaotic withdrawal from Afghanistan, alongside slashing its global aid budget, has tarnished the UK’s reputation on the world stage.

 

This Council calls on Party Group Leaders to:

1.       Write to the Government to inform it of Bristol’s desire to offer assistance to the Afghan refugees, political exiles, and wider diaspora. 

2.       Write to the Government to call on it to offer to house and support Afghan refugees currently in temporary accommodation in foreign countries, such as Pakistan and Tajikistan, in the UK.

3.       Call on the Government to provide local authorities with the necessary resources to house and provide ongoing support to a substantially higher number of refugees than they are currently able.

4.       Publicly state the views of Full Council expressed in this motion.

Motion to be moved by: Councillor Phillipa Hulme

5.      Democracy Motion

This Council notes plans by the Conservative Government to replace the Supplementary Vote system used to elect Mayors, Metro Mayors and Police and Crime Commissioners with First Past the Post.

This Council also notes the Government’s plans to bring in compulsory photo ID for people wanting to vote, well aware that three and a half million people in this country do not have any photo ID.

This Council also congratulates the Welsh Sennedd for passing the Local Government and Elections (Wales) Bill on 21 January this year which delivers the following:

  • The right of Local Councils to scrap First Past the Post and instead elect Councillors using the Single Transferable Vote
  • Votes at 16 - extending the franchise to 16 and 17 year olds and to all foreign citizens legally resident in Wales.
  • Automatic Voter Registration - The bill also paves the way for an overhaul of Wales’ outdated and ineffective system of voter registration. The bill could lead to a new system where registration officers can identify people missing from the register and let them know they’ll be added.

 

English voters are already disadvantaged compared to voters in Northern Ireland, where STV has been used to elect Councils for decades, Scotland, where the same move was made in 2007, and now Wales is making the same changes.

This Council agrees to join the campaign by the Electoral Reform Society to demand the same rights for English voters that are already enjoyed by voters in Northern Ireland where STV has been used for years, Scotland, where STV came in for Council elections in 2007 and in Wales where Councils will, inevitably, make the move to fair voting.

This Council also commits to working with other Councils, Core Cities, Mayors and Metro Mayors and others to:

  • Oppose the scrapping of the Supplementary Vote system that ensures more votes count;
  • Oppose the introduction of compulsory photo ID for voters
  • Demand new legislation to allow:
  • English Councils to switch to STV if they so chose
  • Votes at 16
  • Automatic Voter Registration

 

Finally, this Council calls on all UK political parties to embrace electoral reform for all elections so everyone can vote for the candidates or parties they truly believe in safe in the knowledge that their vote will always count.

Motion to be moved by: Councillor Fabian Breckels

  1. Bristol’s Trial of Electric Scooters

 

This Council recognises the good intentions behind the decision taken last year to conduct a year-long trial of E-scooters in parts of the West of England Combined Authority region.  The rationale was to explore the utility of this form of transport to encourage people to take less car journeys and travel around in a more environmentally friendly and sustainable way.  If popular, such a switch could also positively contribute to the policy aim of cutting carbon emissions.

However, since its inception in October 2020 and subsequent extension, serious problems have emerged in the operation and impact of these vehicles. Council is conscious of increasing complaints around road and pedestrian safety, an apparent lack of policing or enforcement, silent scooters being ridden on pavements to create new hazards and nuisance as well as clutter where motors are simply discarded in a haphazard fashion. One recent survey expects that these ‘powered transporters’ will be involved in up to 200,000 accidents by the end of this year.  In addition, doubts remain over whether E-scooters are as good for the environment as proponents claim or that this kind of ‘active’ travel is really something that should be encouraged. 

Whilst the Mayor has previously expressed fulsome support for this pilot scheme and highlighted the mitigation measures in place by the operator, this Council is concerned that he also seems keen on extending the trial period to March 2022 and, worryingly, opening-up use to private vehicles.  An entirely unregulated, free-for-all system would be a recipe for chaos on our roads and pavements.

Accordingly, Council calls on the Mayor to

1.      Give an assurance that he will pause any further roll-out in range or duration of this scheme. 

2.      In any or all circumstances, he will seek to oppose the granting of access to the public highway of private vehicles.

3.      Provide greater clarity on the criteria which will be used to evaluate ‘success’ in these controversial pilots. 

4.      Confirm what steps are being taken to ensure this experiment is being properly policed. 

5.      Commit to giving all Members an opportunity to vote on whether this particular mode of travel should be permitted to become a permanent feature in our city.”

 

Motion to be moved by: Councillor Lesley Alexander

 

7.      RSPCA – Ending “Pets as Prizes” Campaign

This Council is concerned about the number of cases reported to the RSPCA each year, regarding pets given as prizes in fairgrounds, via social media outlets or through other means in England – and notes that this issue predominantly involves the maltreatment of fish.

 

Such an outdated practice is clearly detrimental to the welfare of what are obviously sentient creatures and, as such, should have no place in modern society.  Moreover, it needs to be recognised that the true scale of this problem remains unknown as many incidents of abusing animals in this way may go unreported each year.

 

As a point of principle and to further highlight this matter, Council would support any move to ban the giving of live animals as a reward or trophy, in any form, on local authority land. 

 

Furthermore, Council calls on the Mayor to endorse this prohibition on the abuse of live animals; explore the potential for this to be a factor in determining the granting of public entertainment licences; and for him to write to the UK Government, urging a change in the law be enacted to forbid the use of live animals in this antiquated manner outside of a family context.

 

Motion to be moved by: Councillor Jonathan Hucker

 

  1. Enforcement of City’s Byelaws

 

“This Council notes that relatively recently (14th March 2017), a whole new set of byelaws were adopted to modernise the

pre-existing set of regulations some of which dated from the Victorian era, and better protect the city’s parks and green spaces.  These remain incredibly important as a means of prohibiting and preventing a range of anti-social behaviours which if left unchecked can ruin the quiet enjoyment of public leisure land.

However, since that time, it has become clear that there are growing problems in the operation and absence of implementation of these rules.  Members are regularly called upon to deal with complaints around such things as fly-tipping, littering, nuisance parking, damage caused by the unlawful riding of motorbikes, impromptu barbecues and casual vandalism.

Accordingly, Council calls upon the Mayor to take a much tougher line in the enforcement of these rules through the Magistrates Courts, and for him to explore the option of reintroducing the lost and lamented local government role of ‘park ranger/keeper’.  These officers provided an invaluable function including acting as a visible presence in wards; helping to deter undesirable activity; were a source of local intelligence; and served as an easy contact point within the Authority whenever problems did arise in their areas of responsibility.”

Motion to be moved by: Councillor Mark Weston

  1. Growing Provision of Allotments Across the City

 

This Council recognises the long-established benefits derived from the provision of small agricultural holdings and allotments to individuals and families.  These sites give people the chance to take productive exercise and grow cheap food but, also, are valued for other reasons such as providing educational opportunities, help to build communities and offer some protection to the local environment.

 

Council notes the commitment previously given by the Mayor to ‘have community gardens and allotments in every ward’ but is anxious to ensure that such rhetoric translates into action.

 

Recently, the Authority had 497 vacancies with a waiting list of 5665 people. Council is concerned that much suitable land held by the Authority for this purpose is either underutilised or could be de-registered for development, ironically, when there is likely to be a growing desire and demand to maintain an allotment.

 

Accordingly, Council calls on the Mayor to pledge to preserve, protect and promote existing sites; to increase the size of this network; extend the number which are accorded (limited) ‘statutory’ protection under current legislation; and ensure that all those who want access to a plot, are able to do so.

 

Motion to be moved by: Councillor Graham Morris

  1. Bike Hangar Provision

 

Full Council notes that:

1.      Bristol is a proud Cycling City, with residents cycling 28,000 return trips everyday (as of Bike Life 2019).

2.      Following the 2018 Climate Emergency Declaration, we have a 2030 net zero carbon emission target.

3.      57,000 people walk or cycle to work, and the number of people cycling to work in Bristol increased by 64% between 2011 (15,800) and 2018 (25,900).

4.      The 2020 One City Climate Strategy notes the need for ‘Enhancing walking and cycling experience and infrastructure through reallocation of road space away from the motor vehicle’.

5.      Bristol’s first ever Citizen Assembly on Climate recommended the transfer of 3-5% of Bristol’s street parking to cycle parking or green space each year.

6.      As of 2020, Bristol only had 15 bike hangars (secure on street bike parking), with plans to deliver another 12-20 more. For comparison Bristol has 15,140 spaces in designated car parks for cars.

7.      Nearly 85,000 of Bristol’s households live in terraced houses, or in flats or bedsits in shared or converted houses, likely with no or minimal outdoor space and poor access.

8.      In the Bike Life 2019 study, 19% of respondents said they didn’t cycle due to a ‘lack of safe of safe storage or facilities’.

 

Full Council believes;

1.      In order to make cycling a more attractive option, safe, secure on-street bike storage is needed across Bristol, but especially in our more socio-economically deprived neighbourhoods.

2.      As we transition away from a carbon lead lifestyle, we must transfer more on-street parking places over to cycle storage.

3.      Local councillors have large amounts of knowledge of their wards, they should be able to lead on placement of bike hangars.

4.      In order to become a leader in cycling accessibility and use, Bristol needs to rapidly and sustainably increase its cycling infrastructure, and should aim to deliver one secure bike parking place for every 10 residents by 2030.

 

Full Council resolves to:

1.      Ask the Mayor to immediately commission a 1 or 2 ward trial of increased bike hangar provision, establishing 50 new bike hangars using best value hangars, run by Bristol City Council, which would assess demand and cost implications.

2.      Ask the Council to produce a report on the viability of the large-scale rollout of bike hangars across the city by working with city partners and WECA.

3.      Establish a new scheme where councillors can recommend given streets for hangars, then council officers will canvass the road/area as is currently done for the provision of car-club spaces.

4.      Ask BCC’s Planning Department to craft a policy on the requirement of bike hangars as part of any new development that doesn’t have adequate bike storage

 

Motion to be moved by: Cllr Alex Hartley

  1. Front Garden Tree Scheme

 

Full Council notes that:

1.       We are deeply concerned about the climate emergency and ecological emergency. This year has yet again seen record temperatures, unpredictable weather patterns, damaging weather events and continued habitat and biodiversity loss across the world.

2.       In order to help mitigate the impact of climate change, we urgently need to plant more trees across the city in line with national and local policies. The UK Government plans to treble tree planting rates by 2024 and Bristol City Council has pledged to double the tree canopy cover in Bristol by 2050.

3.       Street trees have innumerable benefits such as absorbing pollution, reducing the risk of flooding, countering the ‘heat island’ effect of the urban environment, increasing biodiversity and providing wildlife corridors, boosting economic activity, helping with people’s mental health, and even reducing road rage and crime.

4.       The lack of suitable sites for street trees across the city and the high cost of installation is very worrying.

5.       Many thousands of front gardens across the city would provide suitable sites for tree planting with nearly all the benefits of street trees but with vastly reduced expenditure.

6.       The Citizens Assembly on Climate Change recommend that tree cover should be increased as part of creating ‘ideal environmental neighbourhood future streets’.

7.       The 2020 One City Climate Strategy states the 2030 goal on the natural environment that ‘The natural environment in Bristol will be restored, protected and enhanced to deliver climate change benefits’ and specifically to ‘The city’s natural environment (including canopy cover and biodiversity) has been restored, preserved and enhanced to maximise carbon sequestration in carbon sinks, climate resilience and health and wellbeing’

 

Full Council believes;

1.       Increasing tree cover must be a top priority for the Council, its partners, and the citizens of Bristol in our collective fight against the climate emergency.

2.       To increase the tree cover across Bristol, Bristol City Council should work with local residents and community groups to expand tree coverage through the use of front gardens for trees.

3.       Where possible, native species should be planted for the benefit of local wildlife.

 

 Full Council resolves to:

1.       Call for an investigation into the feasibility of setting up a Front Garden Tree Scheme to be run by Bristol City Council officers.

2.       Ask officers to look at how such a scheme would operate, such as how members of the public could participate, how front gardens would be assessed for suitability, how appropriate species would be chosen, installation and aftercare, annual targets, scheme costs and sources of funding.

3.       Investigate working with the Woodland Trust and other charities to procure free or cheaper trees that can be used as part of the scheme.

4.       Ask for a report into the findings to be submitted to Full Council within six months.

 

Motion to be moved by: Cllr Andrew Varney

 

  1. Electric Car Charging Provision

 

Full Council notes that:

1.       The public Electric Vehicle (EV) facilities in Bristol are woefully lacking and not fit for purpose and accepts that this is a barrier to residents switching to EV because of range anxiety.

2.       With new petrol and diesel vehicles set to be banned from sale in 2030 and hybrids by 2035, questions must be asked about the readiness of the UK’s charging network to support the mass switchover. The National Grid estimated there could be 11 million EVs on our roads by 2030 and 36 million by 2040. The RAC estimates that already some 239,000 are in use, yet there are just 25,000 publicly accessible charging points available. The government’s competition and Markets Authority (CMA) anticipates that we will need between 280,000 and 480,000 devices in operation by 2030.

3.       17% of the average Bristol citizen’s carbon emissions come from driving a petrol or diesel car.

4.       According to a working paper on electric vehicle charging capacity from ICCT (International Council on Clean Transportation), Bristol in 2019 had only 11% of the necessary charging infrastructure that will be needed by 2025, and only 4% of what will be needed by 2030.

5.       The cost for the necessary infrastructure for Bristol alone is estimated at between £50-£120million (calculated using a per capita basis using a Deloitte estimation for cost of the UK wide infrastructure of £8-18billion).

6.       The 2020 One City Climate Strategy states the next step to a cleaner climate is the ‘Development of a citywide plan for electric vehicle charging and hydrogen refuelling infrastructure and engage with the market.’

7.       The government body has its own suggestions for improving the network, all of which centre on the idea that charging an EV “should be as simple as filling up with petrol and diesel”, council regrets that this is a long way off. These are:

a.      Charging points should be easy to find. Knowing the location of a nearby charging device or station is worthless if you arrive to find every charger in use or not working. Zap-Map claims to have logged more than 95% of the UK’s public chargers, but only 70% supply their ‘live status’, so there’s a decent chance you won’t be able to use your chosen device on arrival, significantly hindering accessibility.

b.      It should be simple and quick to pay for charging. In July 2019, the government declared that it was “prepared to intervene” if charger providers didn’t start making contactless card payment more widely available. The CMA said of the difficult payment situation: “As we’ve seen in other markets, if it becomes complex or confusing, this damages people’s trust, which isn’t only a concern in itself but also a barrier to EV take-up.” It recommended that charger providers shouldn’t require users to ‘sign up’ to use their devices, thus facilitating and accelerating the charging process. This council calls on government to demand that progress is too slow and they need to prioritise making the change.

c.       Charging costs must be clear. When drivers plug in their cars, it should be obvious how much they will have to pay, regardless of whether costs are calculated per charge, per minute or per unit of electricity consumed. This ties into the pressing need to educate the public on how EVs work: promoting the concept of kilowatt-hours (kWh) as a standard unit of measurement, comparable to litres for petrol and diesel.

d.      Every charger should be compatible with every EV With public chargers today delivering anything from an overnight trickle to a rapid 350kW, a degree of specific knowledge is required when approaching one. Journey planning is possible only if drivers are aware of how long devices will take to charge their cars. This variety introduces another concern: having the right plug or adapter. Mainstream car makers have in Europe now all coalesced around a combination of the Type 2 and CCS connections, minimising the risk of you being caught out. The UK has 34 chargers for every 100,000 people, but the average swings wildly from region to region. In London, the figure is 80, but the north-west, Yorkshire and the Humber and the West Midlands manage just 20, 21 and 22 respectively. In Northern Ireland, it is 17.

 

Full Council believes:

1.                    In order to ensure greater use of electric vehicles, more and better electric vehicle charging points must be provided.

2.                    Future and retrofitting installations should be ‘user friendly’.

3.                    Public charging should be a right and not a lottery.

 

Full Council resolves to:

1.       Call on the administration to lobby central government for a proportion of the £950 million Rapid Charging Fund currently earmarked for upgrading the grid at motorway service stations to be used to implement changes to this city.

2.       Expand on the One City Climate Strategy by calling on Bristol City Council to create a ‘Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Strategy’, that highlights costs, sites, potential partners in the creation of a ‘smart charging system’ for Bristol.

3.       Lobby the West of England Combined Authority to work across our local boundaries to achieve greater economies of scale with our partners in Bath & North East Somerset, South Gloucestershire & North Somerset.

4.       Ask the Mayor to send local authority representatives to The UK Electric & Hybrid Vehicle Charging Infrastructure Symposium to investigate possible partners and learn from other authorities

 

Motion to be moved by: Cllr Jos Clark

 

  1. School Places in South Bristol

 

Full Council notes that:

1.                  There was a widespread welcome when this administration agreed to support the scheme to bring secondary education back to the Daventry Rd site.

2.                  The growing shortage of Year 7 places has been raised repeatedly over recent years and the situation has become even more concerning with the failure to deliver the new school at Temple Meads.

3.                  The further fly in the ointment was that the promised opening date for the newly built school was later than needed in 2023. There has been an attempt to address this with local Cllrs getting support from LEA officers for possible early opening in temporary accommodation in 2022.Possible sites have been identified but matters have now become even more urgent as central government have slipped the opening date from 2023 to2024.

4.                  It is the legal duty of the administration to do everything possible to ensure that there are sufficient school places and the reality is that there will be shortfalls in the hundreds.

 

Full Council resolves to;

 

1.                  Call upon the Mayor to maintain and support the working group of local Cllrs, LEA officers, the education cabinet member and the chair of People’s scrutiny.

2.                  Ensure this group must have an open channel to department of education officers and rapid work needs to take place to establish the deliverability of the shortlist of temporary sites for 2022 or 2023 highlighted including the temporary use of the New Fosseway site.

3.                  Ensure this group reports back to full council at 3 month intervals.

 

Motion to be moved by: Cllr Gary Hopkins

 

  1. Afghan Refugees

 

Full Council notes that:

1.                  Following the recent withdrawal of American troops and the takeover of the Taliban, council expresses its horror at the scenes at Kabul Airport as people frantically try to leave the country.

2.                  The service of Afghan nationals, both to the UK, and to their own government should be highly commended, and people who are at risk of Taliban reprisal should be immediately given asylum.

3.                  Council is particularly concerned about the plight of women and girls in Afghanistan, and think that they, alongside children and minority groups should get preferential access to asylum.

4.                  The Mayor’s commitment to find housing for 10 Afghan families is welcome, but Council feels we must go further.

5.                  Between 2016 and 2021, Bristol housed 367 Syrian refugees under the Vulnerable Persons Resettlement Scheme and the Vulnerable Children Resettlement Scheme.

6.                  Bristol is a proud City of Sanctuary, and should open its doors to those most in need.

7.                  The current government proposal, to take 20,000 refugees over 5 years, is simply not good enough.

 

Full Council believes that:

1.                  The thousands of Afghan refugees currently facing the prospect of death at the hands of the Taliban must be offered a safe and legal method of getting out of Afghanistan.

2.                  The government’s targets for numbers to be resettled are woefully inadequate.

3.                  Bristol must take on its share, and at least match the number of Syrian refugees that were settled, but within a tighter time frame.

 

Full Council resolves to:

1.                  Lobby central government through the Core Cities platform for the government to increase its targets for refugee settlement.

2.                  Ask the Mayor to commit to taking responsibility for the resettlement of at least 500 Afghan nationals over the next 5 years in Bristol.

3.                  Instruct council officers to proactively set up a list of available public and private housing that is suitable for resettlement, to speed up the process.

4.                  Ensure that an adequate assimilation program is in place for any Afghan refugees, and ensure they have the support they need.

 

Motion to be moved by: Cllr Alex Hartley

 

  1. A Universal Basic Income Trial for Bristol

This council notes:

1.      The drastic impacts of the Covid Pandemic on employment and household incomes in the city;

2.      The threat to income and employment from automation and artificial intelligence, which could affect a great many more jobs in future;

3.      The development of universal basic income (UBI) trials in other countries, which offer a non-means-tested sum paid by the state to cover the basic cost of living, which is paid to all citizens individually, regardless of employment status, wealth, or marital status, which has been widely debated in recent months;

4.      That a trial of UBI was promised by the Labour party had the party won the last general election;

5.      The resolutions of other local authorities including Sheffield, Birmingham. Lewes, and Brighton and Hove [with cross party support] calling for trials of UBI;

6.      A network of Universal Basic Income Labs has been set up and works with local authorities across the UK developing UBI proposals to address problems such as poverty, inequality, discrimination and environmental damage, long-term and immediately, in relation to coronavirus. One is operating in Bristol.

7.      Birmingham City Council has issued a briefing on UBI. (1)

8.      UBI has been Green Party Policy since about 1973 and more recently taken up by other parties. (2)

This council believes:

1.      That the current benefit system is failing citizens, with Universal Credit causing hardship to many communities;

2.      A UBI is the fairest, most effective way to mitigate the effects of coronavirus on people’s incomes as it does not discriminate between employment status, caring responsibilities, age, or disability when providing basic support;

3.      There is a danger of increasing numbers of people facing poverty as a result of the coronavirus crisis; 

4.      Testing a UBI is needed, as a UBI has the potential to help address key challenges such as inequality, poverty, precarious employment, loss of community, and breach of planetary boundaries through: 

                    i.            Giving employers a more flexible workforce whilst giving employees greater freedom to change their jobs; 

                   ii.            Valuing unpaid work, such as caring for family members and voluntary work; 

                 iii.            Removing the negative impacts of benefit sanctions and conditionality;  

                 iv.            Giving people more equal resources within the family, workplace and society; 

                   v.            Breaking the link between work and consumption, thus helping reduce strain on the environment in line with the One City Climate Strategy; 

                 vi.            Enabling greater opportunities for people to work in community and cultural activities or to train or reskill in areas that will be needed to transition to a lower-carbon economy. 

5.      The success of a UBI pilot should not be measured only by impact upon take-up of paid work, but also the impact upon communities and what the people within them do, how they feel, and how they relate to others and the environment around them; and, 

6.      Given its history of social innovation, wealth of expertise, and active networks across community, business and public services, Bristol is ideally placed to pilot a UBI. 

 

This council calls on the Mayor to:

1.      Send a joint letter with the other party leaders to the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, the leader of the party in Government, their counterparts in all opposition political parties in parliament, and all local MPs, asking for a trial of Universal Basic Income in the city citing the above reasons.

 

Motion to be moved by: Martin Fodor

Sources

1)      Birmingham City Council’s official UBI briefing - see
https://birmingham.cmis.uk.com/Birmingham/Document.ashx?czJKcaeAi5tUFL1DTL2UE4zNRBcoShgo=nb28HJzZZy8R6UE9qsv3LHJckreeBwn50Tbzg0riXhiHQcf3zr1WGQ%3D%3D&rUzwRPf%2BZ3zd4E7Ikn8Lyw%3D%3D=pwRE6AGJFLDNlh225F5QMaQWCtPHwdhUfCZ%2FLUQzgA2uL5jNRG4jdQ%3D%3D&mCTIbCubSFfXsDGW9IXnlg%3D%3D=hFflUdN3100%3D&kCx1AnS9%2FpWZQ40DXFvdEw%3D%3D=hFflUdN3100%3D&uJovDxwdjMPoYv%2BAJvYtyA%3D%3D=ctNJFf55vVA%3D&FgPlIEJYlotS%2BYGoBi5olA%3D%3D=NHdURQburHA%3D&d9Qjj0ag1Pd993jsyOJqFvmyB7X0CSQK=ctNJFf55vVA%3D&WGewmoAfeNR9xqBux0r1Q8Za60lavYmz=ctNJFf55vVA%3D&WGewmoAfeNQ16B2MHuCpMRKZMwaG1PaO=ctNJFf55vVA%3D&fbclid=IwAR3v5XWzNYc_KENecR4_O6k4xSFL847QcMyKppBD6IUO5x2gLp5E3GdI3_M

2)      https://www.bristol247.com/opinion/your-say/otherpartieswillriudiculegreenpolicies/

 

  1. This Council supports the Climate and Ecological Emergency Bill

 

Full Council notes that:

·       Humans have already caused irreversible climate change, the impacts of which are being felt in the UK and around the world. Global temperatures have increased by 1.2°C from pre-industrial levels and the natural world has reached crisis point, with 28% of plants and animals currently threatened with extinction.

·       Global warming of up to 2°C will be exceeded during the 21st century unless radical reductions in carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gas emissions are achieved in the coming decades. Pledges like the Paris Agreement and updated emissions targets are not legally binding. The gap between pledges and policies leaves the world on course for catastrophic warming of near 3%. As this month’s 2021 report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) made clear, every half a degree makes a world of difference: severe climate impacts with 1.5°C of warming, such as extreme weather patterns causing flooding and heat waves, get significantly worse with 2°C.  According to the IPCC, limiting heating to 1.5°C may still be possible with ambitious action from national and sub-national authorities, civil society, the private sector and local communities.

·       The UK is one of the most nature-depleted countries in the world; more than one in seven of our plants and animals face extinction, and more than 40% are in decline. We have lost 95% of our hedgehogs. The UK needs a legally-enforceable nature target so that by 2030 nature is visibly and measurably on the path of recovery, in line with the Global Goal for Nature and the Leaders' Pledge for Nature.

Full Council recognises that:

·       This Council has already declared Climate and Ecological emergencies, as have hundreds of other local authorities, and many councils are now taking steps to achieve net zero carbon emissions, and to protect and revitalise local wildlife and natural habitats.

·       However, as noted in Bristol’s Climate Emergency motion in November 2018, Government must provide more powers and funding to make the city’s 2030 carbon neutral target possible.

·       In May 2019 Parliament declared an Environment and Climate Emergency, supported by opposition MPs. However, to date this has not been endorsed by Government, nor has the Government developed a strategy that adequately addresses these emergencies.

·       As the UK prepares to host the UN COP26 climate conference this Autumn, our country needs to show stronger leadership on the environment.

·       As the first European local authority to declare a Climate Emergency, a ‘Race to Zero’ city and a key city in the C40-MMC Global Mayors Task Force on Climate and Migration, Bristol is ideally placed to lead and inspire the rest of the UK to take urgent action on the Climate and Ecological Emergencies.

·       There is a Bill before Parliament—the Climate and Ecological Emergency Bill (published as the “Climate and Ecology Bill”), which, if it became law, would require the government to develop a strategy to address the emergency that would ensure:

·       the ecological emergency is tackled shoulder to shoulder with the climate crisis in a joined-up approach;

·       the Paris Agreement is enshrined into law to ensure that UK does its real fair share to limit global temperature rise to the most stringent end of the Paris agreement -1.5°C;

·       the Leaders Pledge for Nature is enshrined into law to ensure that the UK’s ecosystems are protected and restored with a focus on biodiversity, soils and natural carbon sinks;

·       the UK takes full responsibility for our entire greenhouse gas footprint (ie consumption emissions plus shipping, flights and land-based transport) by accounting for all of the emissions that take place overseas to manufacture, transport and dispose of the goods and services we import and consume;

·       the UK takes full responsibility for our ecological footprint so that we protect health and resilience of ecosystems along both domestic and our global supply chains;

·       an independent, temporary Climate and Nature Assembly is set-up, representative of the UK’s population, to engage with the UK Parliament and UK Government to help develop the emergency strategy.

Full Council therefore resolves to ask the Mayor or Cabinet lead to:

·       Support the Climate and Ecological Emergency Bill;

·       Inform the local media of this decision;

·       Write an open letter to Bristol’s four MPs (shared with our residents through local and social media) urging them to sign up to support the Bill, or thanking them for doing so; and

·       Write to the CEE Bill Alliance, the organisers of the campaign for the Bill, expressing its support (joinus@ceebill.uk).

Motion to be moved by: Councillor Carla Denyer

  1. Governance Review

 

This council notes:

 

  1. That there is dissatisfaction with the present system of governance, as evidenced by campaigns that took place in the run up to the recent election;
  2. The Bristol Civic Leadership Project survey in 2018 recommended that the role of councillors needs to be strengthened, that trust and understanding need improving and a democratic deficit needs addressing;
  3. That while the role of Mayor offers high visibility for the City, there is concern about the concentration of power in the Mayor;
  4. That the recent Citizens’ Assembly has been very popular and the recommendations coming from it are good, showing that using more deliberative processes as part of governance should be explored;
  5. That there are a range of options of differing types of governance available:

No change/retain the executive Mayor

Committee system

Leader and cabinet

Hybrid models that might combine some of the strengths of the above*

 

This Council believes:

  1. That there is a strong appetite amongst both elected representatives and citizens for a review of the mayoral model;
  2. That making any decision to change Bristol’s governance is complex and consequential and must be taken with due diligence;
  3. That cultural change is as important as structural change;
  4. That a full assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of the present system must be the starting point of any journey to improve governance;
  5. That it might be possible for changes to be made to Bristol’s Mayoral model to provide more consensus decision-making, without abandoning the mayoral model entirely;
  6. That a full review of governance options must also include alternative models to Bristol’s, such as a committee system and cabinet and leader, plus hybrid models;
  7. That for members to be able to make an informed decision on good governance, they need expert advice on constitutional change and the opportunity to evaluate models working in other authorities;
  8. That a task and finish group could do an in-depth study and report on options to this forum.

 

This council resolves:

  1. To establish a cross-party task and finish group – led by an independent person (e.g. LGA peer or lawyer with expert constitutional knowledge) – to allow for a full review of the governance options available to Bristol, including a potential bespoke hybrid model, to commence in Autumn 2021;
  2. That the necessary resources are given to allow for a full in-depth study of the advantages and disadvantages of the present system of governance and expert information on all possible alternatives, allowing the group to form their recommendation(s);
  3. The recommendation(s) of the working group will come back to Full Council in the form of a report which this council can vote on by February 2022 at the latest;
  4. That, if so decided, this would lead to a referendum.

 

Motion to be moved by: Councillor Paula O’Rourke

 

Notes:

 

  1. Bristol Living Rent

Full Council notes that:

  1. Around a third of Bristol residents are private renters, yet our broken housing market makes renting in Bristol increasingly unaffordable.
  2. Private rents have increased by an average of 52% since 2011 and continue to increase faster than the rate at which incomes rise.
  3. The 2021 quality of life report indicates that a third of renters are unsatisfied with their landlord, yet weak protections for renters and the fear of retaliatory evictions make it difficult to challenge poor quality, unsafe accommodation, or discrimination based on protected characteristics or type of income.
  4. Many letting agents have an informal but well-observed practice of periodically encouraging all their landlord clients to increase rents, contributing to rent inflation.
  5. Local authorities have no means to enforce rent controls, and currently have limited influence on private sector rental values or powers over private landlords.
  6. Both the Green and Labour Party manifestos in the 2019 General Election supported rent controls, and the Mayor of London has pledged to lobby central government for local authority powers to control rent levels.
  7. The high cost of rent disproportionately affects younger people and marginalised people in the city.

Full Council believes that:

  1. High private rental costs push people into poverty, debt, and homelessness, contribute to overcrowding, and negatively impact the mental and physical health of renters.
  2. Rent increases can be unfair on tenants and can directly lead to housing insecurity.
  3. Genuinely affordable rents give people the freedom to live a decent life, helping to lift families out of poverty and not just manage each month.
  4. Local authorities should be granted powers to control rents and regulate the private rental market.
  5. A “living rent” should be defined relative not to the housing market but to the household income of a region.
  6. People on lower incomes should typically not have to spend more than around a third of take-home pay on rent, as recommended by the housing charity Shelter.

Full Council resolves:

  1. To support the Mayor to publicly lobby central government for direct powers to control rents and regulate the private rental market of Bristol.
  2. To further ask the Mayor to lobby the government for direct powers to give tenants increased rights pertaining to negotiating their minimum tenancy agreements.
  3. To research, publish and promote an annual “Bristol living rent” for the private rented sector with a view to exerting influence on the rental market within Bristol. The “living rent” will be specified with consideration of dwelling size.
  4. To include in the report the “living rent increase” per annum.
  5. To include in this report the current actual average rent rates in each area of Bristol.
  6. To define “living rent” as a proportion of median income for Bristolians. The report will make use of existing ONS data on household income.

Motion to be moved by: Councillor Barry Parsons

19.  Mobilise community investments to tackle climate change

 

Full Council notes:

1.      That this council unanimously declared a climate emergency in November 2018 following a Green Motion to Council

2.      The motion committed the city to achieve net zero carbon impact by 2030 and there are now 9 years left to this target date

3.      The council has been progressing a package of low carbon opportunities called City Leap since May 2018. City Leap is still subject to a procurement process since a new process was started in 2020.

4.      A new low risk model called Community Municipal Investments [CMI] has been developed by Leeds University and Abundance Investments platform with UK Government and EU support. This had the support of 4 local authorities including Bristol City Council. [1]

5.      This concept is proven to mobilise local and other investment and channels local savings into local projects with low risk and a modest return to investors [2] and after the first issue further calls can be automated.

 

Full Council believes:

1.      That offering local savers a way to support the city’s journey to carbon neutrality mobilises community engagement in the process of change, attracts significant sums for named projects, and should be developed. 72% of people want to lend savings to help councils develop Climate Emergency Plans [3]

2.      That offering security and a modest rate of interest through municipal bonds is an established way to develop local infrastructure [4]. This could complement other projects such as the successful Bristol Energy Cooperative.

3.      That CMIs can help us develop a series of practical projects for a low carbon transition now in partnership with others which will be popular with local savers.

4.      The Mayor should prioritise CMIs as part of the package of investments that will create positive economic opportunities and carbon neutrality while building community wealth.

5.      Bristol should join the other 3 pioneers of CMI in developing local opportunities for local investors [e.g. 5]

 

Full Council resolves:

  1. To call on the Mayor to begin development of Community Municipal Investments for the city.
  2. That the Mayor promote CMI as a way residents and institutions can be engaged and actively involved in contributing to a zero carbon city.
  3. To request officers to identify carbon saving projects suited to CMI investment in conjunction with city partners.

Motion to be moved by: Cllr Martin Fodor

References:

  1. The report supported by Bristol: https://baumaninstitute.leeds.ac.uk/research/financing-for-society/
  2. Initial proposed interest rate is 1.2%. See: Your questions answered on Green Community Bonds | Abundance Blog
    https://medium.abundanceinvestment.com/community-municipal-investments-your-questions-answered-25218ed4d2cb
  3. Survey by One Poll, 2020, cited by the Local Government Association.
  4. https://medium.abundanceinvestment.com/community-municipal-investments-the-new-option-for-your-low-risk-money-a9cc5d72e03a?source=post_internal_links---------1------------------
  5. These are: Leeds Council, Warrington, and West Berkshire. Eg Invest now: https://info.westberks.gov.uk/wbcmi; https://www.abundanceinvestment.com/invest-now/warrington-2025

 

 

Minutes:

Following a short adjournment, it was then moved by the Lord Mayor that standing order CPR2.1(xi) be suspended to allow the meeting to go past the 30 minutes time limit for motions.  Following a vote it was agreed to proceed up until a 45 minute limit for motions and a 9pm finish time for the meeting.

Golden Motion: PROTECT THE GREEN BELT AND BRISTOL’S GREEN SPACES

 

Councillor Eddy moved the following motion:

 

This Council welcomes the importance placed by Her Majesty’s Government on the protection of the Green Belt and endorses the main reasons given for preserving this strategic space.

 

These zones are essential to check urban sprawl; prevent the merging of neighbouring towns; safeguard the countryside from encroachment; preserve the setting and special characteristics of historic areas; and assist in urban regeneration by encouraging the recycling of already developed land.

 

The need to conserve the existing Green Belt, as well as retaining vital green spaces, remains a major priority for most people in our city.   As a result, Council notes the Mayor’s recent decision to not now build housing on Brislington Meadows and to ‘look again’ at housing plans which would destroy the Western Slopes wildlife corridor.

 

Sadly, there are other equally significant sites which remain under the threat of the bulldozer.  One such place is Yew Tree Farm, Bristol’s last working farm.  The family there has been recognised by the Avon Wildlife Trust and RSPB for the huge strides made in achieving sustainable, low-intensity, organic local food production, whilst maintaining abundant and attractive biodiversity. 

 

Considering the Mayor’s pledges around combatting food poverty and encouraging communities to grow more of their own food, Council calls for a halt to the proposed redevelopment of or incursion into any remaining productive wildlife rich agricultural land. 

 

Furthermore, the Mayor is asked to give a cast-iron commitment that he will look instead to increase the emphasis placed in the Authority’s Site Allocations and Development Management policies on re-using or re-purposing existing and emerging ‘brownfield’, previously developed or urban centres rather than continuing to erode our surrounding fields and countryside.

 

The motion was seconded by Councillor Hucker.

 

Councillor Renhard then moved the following amendment:

 

‘That the motion be amended to read as follows:

 

This Council welcomes the importance placed by Her Majesty’s Government on the protection of the Green Belt and endorses the main reasons given for preserving this strategic space.

 

These zones are essential to check urban sprawl; prevent the merging of neighbouring towns; safeguard the countryside from encroachment; preserve the setting and special characteristics of historic areas; and assist in urban regeneration by encouraging the recycling of already developed land.

 

The need to conserve the existing Green Belt, as well as retaining vital green spaces, remains a major priority for most people in our city.   As a result, Council notes the Mayor’s recent decision to not now build housing on Brislington Meadows and to ‘look again’ at housing plans which would destroy the Western Slopes wildlife corridor.

 

Sadly, there are other equally significant sites which remain under the threat of the bulldozer.  One such place is Yew Tree Farm, Bristol’s last working farm.  The family there has been recognised by the Avon Wildlife Trust and RSPB for the huge strides made in achieving sustainable, low-intensity, organic local food production, whilst maintaining abundant and attractive biodiversity. 

 

Considering the Mayor’s pledges around combatting food poverty and encouraging communities to grow more of their own food, Council calls for a halt to the proposed redevelopment of or incursion into any remaining productive wildlife rich agricultural land.  Furthermore, the Mayor is asked to give a cast-iron commitment that he will look instead to increase the emphasis placed in the Authority’s Site Allocations and Development Management policies on re-using or re-purposing existing and emerging ‘brownfield’, previously developed or urban centres rather than continuing to erode our surrounding fields and countryside.

 

This Council also notes the inclusion of the Government’s Planning Bill in the 2021 Queen’s Speech, the content of which runs contrary to the views expressed in this motion. Full Council believes this Planning Bill, that would abolish Section 106, fetter Development Control committees and lead to a free-for-all for housing developers, is an affront to local democracy as it could see developers build on green space with no public consultation or democratic oversight. This Council therefore calls on Party Group Leaders to write to the Government to make it clear of its view that this bill should not become law.

 

The amendment was seconded by Councillor Cole.

 

Following debate, upon being put to the vote, the amendment was LOST.

 

The Lord Mayor then invited Councillor Eddy, as mover of the original motion to speak.

 

Councillor Plowden then moved the following amendment:

This Council welcomes the importance placed by Her Majesty’s Government on the protection of the Green Belt and endorses the main reasons given for preserving this strategic space.

 

These zones are essential to check urban sprawl; prevent the merging of neighbouring towns; safeguard the countryside from encroachment; preserve the setting and special characteristics of historic areas; and assist in urban regeneration by encouraging the recycling of already developed land.

 

The need to conserve the existing Green Belt, as well as retaining vital green spaces, remains a major priority for most people in our city.   As a result, Council notes the Mayor’s recent decision to not now build housing on Brislington Meadows and to ‘look again’ at housing plans which would destroy the Western Slopes wildlife corridor.

 

Sadly, there are other equally significant sites which remain under the threat of the bulldozer.  One such place is Yew Tree Farm, Bristol’s last working farm.  The family there has been recognised by the Avon Wildlife Trust and RSPB for the huge strides made in achieving sustainable, low-intensity, organic local food production, whilst maintaining abundant and attractive biodiversity. 

 

Council also welcomes the Mayor’s pledges around combatting food poverty and encouraging communities to grow more of their own food. 

 

Council notes that much of the land we may think of as Green Belt is in fact designated as Sites of Nature Conservation interest (SNCIs) and wildlife corridors, and that whilst this land has some protection granted under local planning regulation, policy may override these protections.

 

Full Council resolves: 

 

1. To call for a halt to the proposed redevelopment of or incursion into any remaining productive wildlife rich agricultural land. 

 

2. To ask the Mayor to give a cast-iron commitment that he will look instead to increase the emphasis placed in the Authority’s Site Allocations and Development Management policies on re-using or re-purposing existing and emerging ‘brownfield’, previously developed or urban centres where not also needed as space for nature rather than continuing to erode our surrounding fields and countryside.

 

3. In the forthcoming update of the site allocations policies, to make every effort to avoid designating any SNCIs for development.

 

4. To create policy to prioritise the preservation of the integrity of any wildlife corridors contained within sites designated for development.

 

5. To work with adjacent local authorities and WECA to reinforce our policies on preserving Green Belt, and to work with these bodies to preserve our cherished countryside.

 

6. To assign or instruct officers to consider adopting the Western Slopes and Brislington Meadows as Local Green Space as provided for within NPPF guidance, providing similar planning protection as for the Green Belt. 

 

7. Furthermore, to work with local communities across Bristol to similarly make every effort to designate much loved green space in other parts of the city and noting that such protection for green space was proposed as part of the recent Bristol Local Plan Review.

 

The amendment was seconded by Councillor Hance.

 

Following debate, upon being put to the vote, the amendment was CARRIED.

(41 For, 0 against, 22 abstentions)

 

Mayor Rees was invited to speak on the debate.

 

The Lord Mayor then moved to vote on the motion as amended.

 

Upon being put to the vote, the motion as amended was CARRIED.

(41 For, 0 against, 22 abstentions)

 

RESOLVED:

 

This Council welcomes the importance placed by Her Majesty’s Government on the protection of the Green Belt and endorses the main reasons given for preserving this strategic space.

 

These zones are essential to check urban sprawl; prevent the merging of neighbouring towns; safeguard the countryside from encroachment; preserve the setting and special characteristics of historic areas; and assist in urban regeneration by encouraging the recycling of already developed land.

 

The need to conserve the existing Green Belt, as well as retaining vital green spaces, remains a major priority for most people in our city.   As a result, Council notes the Mayor’s recent decision to not now build housing on Brislington Meadows and to ‘look again’ at housing plans which would destroy the Western Slopes wildlife corridor.

 

Sadly, there are other equally significant sites which remain under the threat of the bulldozer.  One such place is Yew Tree Farm, Bristol’s last working farm.  The family there has been recognised by the Avon Wildlife Trust and RSPB for the huge strides made in achieving sustainable, low-intensity, organic local food production, whilst maintaining abundant and attractive biodiversity. 

 

Council also welcomes the Mayor’s pledges around combatting food poverty and encouraging communities to grow more of their own food. 

 

Council notes that much of the land we may think of as Green Belt is in fact designated as Sites of Nature Conservation interest (SNCIs) and wildlife corridors, and that whilst this land has some protection granted under local planning regulation, policy may override these protections.

 

Full Council resolves: 

 

1. To call for a halt to the proposed redevelopment of or incursion into any remaining productive wildlife rich agricultural land. 

 

2. To ask the Mayor to give a cast-iron commitment that he will look instead to increase the emphasis placed in the Authority’s Site Allocations and Development Management policies on re-using or re-purposing existing and emerging ‘brownfield’, previously developed or urban centres where not also needed as space for nature rather than continuing to erode our surrounding fields and countryside.

 

3. In the forthcoming update of the site allocations policies, to make every effort to avoid designating any SNCIs for development.

 

4. To create policy to prioritise the preservation of the integrity of any wildlife corridors contained within sites designated for development.

 

5. To work with adjacent local authorities and WECA to reinforce our policies on preserving Green Belt, and to work with these bodies to preserve our cherished countryside.

 

6. To assign or instruct officers to consider adopting the Western Slopes and Brislington Meadows as Local Green Space as provided for within NPPF guidance, providing similar planning protection as for the Green Belt. 

 

7. Furthermore, to work with local communities across Bristol to similarly make every effort to designate much loved green space in other parts of the city and noting that such protection for green space was proposed as part of the recent Bristol Local Plan Review.

 

 

Silver Motion - Achieve Zero Carbon Development

 

Councillor Stone moved the following motion:

 

Full Council notes that:

 

1. Bristol City Council declared a Climate Emergency in November 2018 following a Green Motion set out by Carla Denyer.

 

2. The motion committed the city to achieve net zero carbon by 2030 and there are now only 9 years left to this target date.

 

3. The Council is currently required to implement the Government approved uplift to Part L (power and energy standards) and F (ventilation standards), of the new building regulations due to be published in December 2021 for implementation from June 2022

 

4. Responses to the Government’s 2020 consultation on the Future Homes Standards made it clear that the Part L uplift proposed for December 2021 was insufficient to meet the government’s zero carbon target for 2050, and called for higher standards.

 

5. The Council has the capacity and authority to set local energy efficiency standards for new homes as set out in the Planning and Energy Act 2008, and may set them at a higher level than government standards. Local Planning Authorities must do this through their development plan documents, following consultation and examination by planning inspector.

 

6. The Council’s Local Plan is currently under review and often goes above-and-beyond the proposed 2021 building regulations. The Council also notes that the draft 2019 Local Plan would encourage all new developments to be zero carbon and this aim was reiterated in Progressing Bristol’s Development – a Bristol City Council statement on planning in Bristol.

 

Full Council believes:

 

1. Only implementing the minimum uplift values for Part L (see appendix A) in Dec 2021 for new homes would require further costly retrofitting in the future in order for homes to meet our 2030 carbon targets.

 

2. Implementing the principles of the proposed building regulation requirements for Part L discussed in the Futures Homes Standards 2025, in December 2021, would  contribute to Bristol reaching our zero carbon targets by 2030.

 

3. The Council’s revised Local Plan should seek to require rather than simply ‘encourage’ zero carbon development of all types of buildings.

 

4. It will be necessary to set out a strategic plan and use the powers in the revised Local Plan to ensure that all buildings which receive planning consent from 2024 are to be built to a 100% zero carbon standard.

 

Full Council Resolves:

 

1. To call on the administration to implement the powers of the Council with respect to the Planning and Energy Act 2008 and apply zero carbon Standards at the earliest possible opportunity through revision of the Local Plan.

 

2. That the administration promote all new buildings to be built zero carbon from 2025, and that a strategic plan is established in partnership with the homes board and in consultation with the building development industry to enable some Bristol City Council and private projects to achieve this standard earlier

 

Councillor Pearce seconded the motion.

 

Following debate, upon being put to the vote, the motion was CARRIED (61 For, 0 against, 0 abstention) it was RESOLVED:

 

Full Council notes that:

 

1. Bristol City Council declared a Climate Emergency in November 2018 following a Green Motion set out by Carla Denyer.

 

2. The motion committed the city to achieve net zero carbon by 2030 and there are now only 9 years left to this target date.

 

3. The Council is currently required to implement the Government approved uplift to Part L (power and energy standards) and F (ventilation standards), of the new building regulations due to be published in December 2021 for implementation from June 2022

 

4. Responses to the Government’s 2020 consultation on the Future Homes Standards made it clear that the Part L uplift proposed for December 2021 was insufficient to meet the government’s zero carbon target for 2050 and called for higher standards.

 

5. The Council has the capacity and authority to set local energy efficiency standards for new homes as set out in the Planning and Energy Act 2008 and may set them at a higher level than government standards. Local Planning Authorities must do this through their development plan documents, following consultation and examination by planning inspector.

 

6. The Council’s Local Plan is currently under review and often goes above-and-beyond the proposed 2021 building regulations. The Council also notes that the draft 2019 Local Plan would encourage all new developments to be zero carbon and this aim was reiterated in Progressing Bristol’s Development – a Bristol City Council statement on planning in Bristol.

 

Full Council believes:

 

1. Only implementing the minimum uplift values for Part L (see appendix A) in Dec 2021 for new homes would require further costly retrofitting in the future in order for homes to meet our 2030 carbon targets.

 

2. Implementing the principles of the proposed building regulation requirements for Part L discussed in the Futures Homes Standards 2025, in December 2021, would contribute to Bristol reaching our zero carbon targets by 2030.

 

3. The Council’s revised Local Plan should seek to require rather than simply ‘encourage’ zero carbon development of all types of buildings.

 

4. It will be necessary to set out a strategic plan and use the powers in the revised Local Plan to ensure that all buildings which receive planning consent from 2024 are to be built to a 100% zero carbon standard.

 

Full Council Resolves:

 

1. To call on the administration to implement the powers of the Council with respect to the Planning and Energy Act 2008 and apply zero carbon Standards at the earliest possible opportunity through revision of the Local Plan.

 

2. That the administration promote all new buildings to be built zero carbon from 2025, and that a strategic plan is established in partnership with the homes board and in consultation with the building development industry to enable some Bristol City Council and private projects to achieve this standard earlier

 

Supporting documents: