Agenda item

Motions

Note:

Under the Council’s constitution, 30 minutes are available for the consideration of motions. In practice, this realistically means that there is usually only time for one, or possibly two motions to be considered.

 

With the agreement of the Lord Mayor, motion 1 below will be considered at this meeting, and motion 2 is likely to be considered, subject to time.

 

Details of other motions submitted, (which, due to time constraints, are very unlikely to be considered at this meeting) are also set out for information.

 

MOTIONS RECEIVED FOR FULL COUNCIL

 

MOTION 1 - A Workplace Parking Levy for Bristol

 

Full Council notes

1.      A Workplace Parking Levy (also referred to as Corporate Parking Levy) is a licensing scheme for active workplace car parking places. They vary in detail and can include various concessions (e.g. blue badge holders; smaller businesses; NHS facilities). These schemes reduce driving into the city centre and provide funds that can be reinvested in transport alternatives or improvements.

2.      That the proposal for a Workplace Parking Levy (WPL) was initially discussed in Bristol ten years ago and we have fallen behind other cities in its implementation.

3.      A scoping study produced for Bristol Council in 2011 estimated that a citywide workplace Parking Levy (with small businesses exempted) could generate a net revenue of around £11 million per year.

4.      Following a budget amendment made by the Green Party in 2020, an appraisal report is now being developed. We further note that as it has yet to be published, it is unclear as to the detail of implementation. We understand that the report’s findings are generally in favour of WPL.

5.      The growing national base of evidence for WPL. Most notable is Nottingham which has been running its scheme since 2011 and now raises £9 million a year with a circa £400 WPL with minimal running costs

6.      Support for exploring a WPL was noted in the Bristol Transport Strategy adopted in 2019.

7.      There are several, evidenced benefits of WPLs, including:

·         Reduction in congestion and associated air quality improvements;

·         Investment in public and active transport;

·         Freeing up land - unlike a congestion charge, the WPL has an evidenced bonus effect of making more land available for other uses, such as green space or new residential buildings.

·         That any levy is easy to administer, keeping transactional costs to a minimum  

·         They encourage private sector involvement and investment in the city 

·         There is unlikely to be any additional pressure on on-street parking as the levy is on the space not the vehicle 

8.      Councillors will need to see the detail, but it is anticipated that the coming report will add to the positive national evidence base for the policy.

 

Full Council resolves to call on the administration to:

1.      Share and make the appraisal report on WPL public when it is complete

2.      Formally commit to a WPL scheme for Bristol (pending the report’s findings)

3.      To publish a timetabled delivery plan for a WPL scheme with the aim of going out to consultation by April 2022 with full implementation within two years of that date (compatible with the Local Transport Act 2000)

4.      Approach Government to ensure as much match funding as possible

5.      Work with WECA to see if a WPL can be developed in parallel in other neighbouring authorities

Motion proposed by: Councillor Wilcox (Green Group)

Date Submitted: 28th October 2021

 

Notes

-          Bristol Transport Strategy - https://www.bristol.gov.uk/documents/20182/3641895/Bristol+Transport+Strategy+-+adopted+2019.pdf/383a996e-2219-dbbb-dc75-3a270bfce26c

-          Information on Nottingham’s Workplace Parking Levy:

o   https://www.nottinghamcity.gov.uk/wpl

o   https://www.transportxtra.com/publications/parking-review/news/68005/the-workplace-parking-levy-nottingham-pioneers-the-way-ahead/

 

 

MOTION 2 - National Disability Strategy

 

The Council notes:

·         The Government published its long-awaited National Disability Strategy on 28 July.

·         This strategy has been strongly criticised by disabled people and their organisations for not coming up with any solutions for addressing the barriers, issues and priorities that they have identified for years.

·         The lack of engagement with disabled groups has also been strongly criticised and is so severe that the Disabled People’s Organisations Forum are taking the Government to court, as the absence of meaningful consultation could be deemed unlawful.

·         In addition to this, disabled people have been disproportionately affected by the pandemic, as 60% people dying from Covid were disabled, despite disabled people only making up 20% of the population.

·         Disabled people have also borne the brunt of decade-long Government austerity through cuts to the key public services that they rely on and are also over-represented in unemployment figures - particularly those with learning difficulties.

·         The Government is still yet to formulate a solution to the social care crisis, despite the Prime Minister’s pledge to deliver a plan two years ago, which is emblematic of this Government’s lack of support for disabled people.

The Council believes:

·         The National Disability Strategy is not fit for purpose and is a tick-box exercise that does nothing to address the issues facing disabled people in Bristol.

·         That disabled people have been routinely ignored by this Government, and their interests need to be prioritised and new resources identified by the Government in its Covid recovery plans.

 

This Council resolves:

·         To call on Party Group Leaders to issue public statements stating that Bristol City Council does not believe the current Strategy is fit for purpose.

·         To call on Party Group Leaders to write to the Government to ask it to formulate a new National Disability Strategy that is co-produced with disabled people and their organisations. This must address how they intend to revise and resource the broken adult care and benefits systems to enable disabled people to contribute to society and to live inclusive and independent lives.

 

To be moved by Cllr Helen Holland (Labour Group)

Motion submitted 28th October 2021


 

 

Minutes:

Following a short adjournment, it was then moved by the Lord Mayor that standing order CPR2.1(xi) be suspended to allow the meeting to go past the 30 minutes time limit for motions and beyond the 2.5 hours total time for the meeting.  Following a vote it was agreed to proceed with the item to hear the first ‘golden’ motion.

Golden Motion: A Workplace Parking Levy for Bristol

 

Councillor Wilcox moved the following motion:

 

Full Council notes

1.      A Workplace Parking Levy (also referred to as Corporate Parking Levy) is a licensing scheme for active workplace car parking places. They vary in detail and can include various concessions (e.g. blue badge holders; smaller businesses; NHS facilities). These schemes reduce driving into the city centre and provide funds that can be reinvested in transport alternatives or improvements.

2.      That the proposal for a Workplace Parking Levy (WPL) was initially discussed in Bristol ten years ago and we have fallen behind other cities in its implementation.

3.      A scoping study produced for Bristol Council in 2011 estimated that a citywide workplace Parking Levy (with small businesses exempted) could generate a net revenue of around £11 million per year.

4.      Following a budget amendment made by the Green Party in 2020, an appraisal report is now being developed. We further note that as it has yet to be published, it is unclear as to the detail of implementation. We understand that the report’s findings are generally in favour of WPL.

5.      The growing national base of evidence for WPL. Most notable is Nottingham which has been running its scheme since 2011 and now raises £9 million a year with a circa £400 WPL with minimal running costs

6.      Support for exploring a WPL was noted in the Bristol Transport Strategy adopted in 2019.

7.      There are several, evidenced benefits of WPLs, including:

·         Reduction in congestion and associated air quality improvements;

·         Investment in public and active transport;

·         Freeing up land - unlike a congestion charge, the WPL has an evidenced bonus effect of making more land available for other uses, such as green space or new residential buildings.

·         That any levy is easy to administer, keeping transactional costs to a minimum  

·         They encourage private sector involvement and investment in the city 

·         There is unlikely to be any additional pressure on on-street parking as the levy is on the space not the vehicle 

8.      Councillors will need to see the detail, but it is anticipated that the coming report will add to the positive national evidence base for the policy.

 

Full Council resolves to call on the administration to:

1.      Share and make the appraisal report on WPL public when it is complete

2.      Formally commit to a WPL scheme for Bristol (pending the report’s findings)

3.      To publish a timetabled delivery plan for a WPL scheme with the aim of going out to consultation by April 2022 with full implementation within two years of that date (compatible with the Local Transport Act 2000)

4.      Approach Government to ensure as much match funding as possible

5.      Work with WECA to see if a WPL can be developed in parallel in other neighbouring authorities

 

The motion was seconded by Councillor Wye.

 

Councillor Don Alexander then moved the following amendment:

 

‘That the motion be amended to read as follows:

 

Full Council notes

1.      A Workplace Parking Levy (also referred to as Corporate Parking Levy) is a licensing scheme for active workplace car parking places. They vary in detail and can include various concessions (e.g. blue badge holders; smaller businesses; NHS facilities). These schemes reduce driving into the city centre, by imposing a tax on businesses which can be passed on to its employees, and provide funds that can be reinvested in transport alternatives or improvements.

2.      That the proposal for a Workplace Parking Levy (WPL) was initially discussed in Bristol ten years ago

3.      A scoping study produced for Bristol Council in 2011 estimated that a citywide workplace Parking Levy (with small businesses exempted) could generate a net revenue of around £11 million per year, so a new scoping study would be needed before consultation and possible implementation

 

4.      The effect the incoming Clean Air Zone will have on city centre traffic and that a new study on predicted income raised from a WPL will need to be undertaken to take this into account.

 

5.      Following a budget amendment made by the Green Party in 2020, an appraisal report is now being developed.

6.      Nottingham is the only city to have introduced a WPL and did so ten years ago. Since 2011, Policy proposals for improving congestion and air quality in cities have moved on to other interventions, such as Clean Air Zones.

7.      Support for exploring a WPL was noted in the Bristol Transport Strategy adopted in 2019.

8.      There are several, evidenced benefits of WPLs, including:

·         Reduction in congestion and associated air quality improvements;

·         Investment in public and active transport;

·         Freeing up land - unlike a congestion charge, the WPL has an evidenced bonus effect of making more land available for other uses, such as green space or new residential buildings.

·         That any levy is easy to administer, keeping transactional costs to a minimum  

·         They encourage private sector involvement and investment in the city 

·         There is unlikely to be any additional pressure on on-street parking as the levy is on the space not the vehicle 

9.      Councillors will need to see the detail, but it is anticipated that the coming report will Provide more detailed information for Full Council’s consideration at a later date.

10.  A WPL would be imposed on organisations with car parking spaces, it could include schools, care homes, and colleges and would create extra costs which they may choose to pass on to others.

11.  The imposition of a new tax on the citizens and businesses of Bristol needs to be given due consideration and treated with gravitas, and that agreeing to a new tax without knowing how much it would raise nor what the potential benefits of it would be negligent on the part of Bristol City Council.

 

Full Council resolves to call on the administration to:

1.        Share and make the appraisal report on WPL public when it is complete.

2.        To report back to Full Council on the report’s findings and, if the administration sees fit, to publish a delivery timetable.

3.        Approach Government to ensure as much match funding as possible, if decided a WPL is in Bristol’s interests.

4.    Write to WECA authorities to gauge their interests in developing their own WPL schemes.’

 

The amendment was seconded by Councillor Bennett.

 

Following debate and final remarks from the mover of the amendment and the original motion, upon being put to the vote, the amendment was CARRIED (33 for, 32 against)

 

Councillor Hartley then moved the following amendment:

 

‘That the motion be amended to read as follows:

 

Full Council notes

1.      A Workplace Parking Levy (also referred to as Corporate Parking Levy) is a licensing scheme for active workplace car parking places. They vary in detail and can include various concessions (e.g. blue badge holders; smaller businesses; NHS facilities). These schemes reduce driving into the city centre, by imposing a tax on businesses which can be passed on to its employees, and provide funds that can be reinvested in transport alternatives or improvements.

2.      That the proposal for a Workplace Parking Levy (WPL) was initially discussed in Bristol ten years ago

3.      A scoping study produced for Bristol Council in 2011 estimated that a citywide workplace Parking Levy (with small businesses exempted) could generate a net revenue of around £11 million per year, so a new scoping study would be needed before consultation and possible implementation

4.      The effect the incoming Clean Air Zone will have on city centre traffic and that a new study on predicted income raised from a WPL will need to be undertaken to take this into account.

5.      Following a budget amendment made by the Green Party in 2020, an appraisal report is now being developed.

6.      Nottingham is the only city to have introduced a WPL and did so ten years ago. Since 2011, Policy proposals for improving congestion and air quality in cities have moved on to other interventions, such as Clean Air Zones.

7.      Support for exploring a WPL was noted in the Bristol Transport Strategy adopted in 2019.

8.      There are several, evidenced benefits of WPLs, including:

·         Reduction in congestion and associated air quality improvements;

·         Investment in public and active transport;

·         Freeing up land - unlike a congestion charge, the WPL has an evidenced bonus effect of making more land available for other uses, such as green space or new residential buildings.

·         That any levy is easy to administer, keeping transactional costs to a minimum  

·         They encourage private sector involvement and investment in the city 

·         There is unlikely to be any additional pressure on on-street parking as the levy is on the space not the vehicle 

9.      Councillors will need to see the detail, but it is anticipated that the coming report will Provide more detailed information for Full Council’s consideration at a later date.

10.  A WPL would be imposed on organisations with car parking spaces, it could include schools, care homes, and colleges and would create extra costs which they may choose to pass on to others.

11.  The imposition of a new tax on the citizens and businesses of Bristol needs to be given due consideration and treated with gravitas, and that agreeing to a new tax without knowing how much it would raise nor what the potential benefits of it would be negligent on the part of Bristol City Council.

 

Full Council resolves to call on the administration to:

1.      Share and make the appraisal report on WPL public when it is complete

2.      To report back to Full Council on the report’s findings and, if the administration sees fit, to publish a delivery timetable. If the administration publishes a timetable, Full Council would expect this delivery timetable to go out to consultation as soon as possible, with a targeted 2024 implementation date.

 3.  Approach Government to ensure as much match funding as possible , if decided a WPL is in Bristol’s interests

4.  Write to WECA authorities and North Somserset Council to gauge their interests in developing their own WPL schemes and work proactively to encourage the neighbouring authorities to do so.

5.   Ask the Mayor and Cabinet Member for Finance to commit to ringfencing any raised revenue from a potential WPL scheme to be invested in improving other non-car sustainable transport measures i.e invested in walking & cycling routes, and improving access to public transport services.

6.  Ask the Mayor to reach out to city partners to encourage them to invest in active travel measures for employees, and also employee bus schemes

 

The amendment was seconded by Councillor Clark.

 

Following debate and final remarks from the mover of the amendment and the original motion, upon being put to the vote, the amendment was LOST (32 for, 33 against)

 

There was a debate on the substantive motion (as amended).  The Lord Mayor then invited Councillor Wilcox, as mover of the original motion, to speak.

 

Following final remarks, upon being put to the vote, the original motion was unanimously CARRIED and it was

 

RESOLVED:

 

Full Council notes:

1.      A Workplace Parking Levy (also referred to as Corporate Parking Levy) is a licensing scheme for active workplace car parking places. They vary in detail and can include various concessions (e.g. blue badge holders; smaller businesses; NHS facilities). These schemes reduce driving into the city centre, by imposing a tax on businesses which can be passed on to its employees, and provide funds that can be reinvested in transport alternatives or improvements.

2.      That the proposal for a Workplace Parking Levy (WPL) was initially discussed in Bristol ten years ago

3.      A scoping study produced for Bristol Council in 2011 estimated that a citywide workplace Parking Levy (with small businesses exempted) could generate a net revenue of around £11 million per year, so a new scoping study would be needed before consultation and possible implementation

 

4.      The effect the incoming Clean Air Zone will have on city centre traffic and that a new study on predicted income raised from a WPL will need to be undertaken to take this into account.

 

5.      Following a budget amendment made by the Green Party in 2020, an appraisal report is now being developed.

6.      Nottingham is the only city to have introduced a WPL and did so ten years ago. Since 2011, Policy proposals for improving congestion and air quality in cities have moved on to other interventions, such as Clean Air Zones.

7.      Support for exploring a WPL was noted in the Bristol Transport Strategy adopted in 2019.

8.      There are several, evidenced benefits of WPLs, including:

·         Reduction in congestion and associated air quality improvements;

·         Investment in public and active transport;

·         Freeing up land - unlike a congestion charge, the WPL has an evidenced bonus effect of making more land available for other uses, such as green space or new residential buildings.

·         That any levy is easy to administer, keeping transactional costs to a minimum  

·         They encourage private sector involvement and investment in the city 

·         There is unlikely to be any additional pressure on on-street parking as the levy is on the space not the vehicle 

9.      Councillors will need to see the detail, but it is anticipated that the coming report will Provide more detailed information for Full Council’s consideration at a later date.

10.  A WPL would be imposed on organisations with car parking spaces, it could include schools, care homes, and colleges and would create extra costs which they may choose to pass on to others.

11.  The imposition of a new tax on the citizens and businesses of Bristol needs to be given due consideration and treated with gravitas, and that agreeing to a new tax without knowing how much it would raise nor what the potential benefits of it would be negligent on the part of Bristol City Council.

 

Full Council resolves to call on the administration to:

1.        Share and make the appraisal report on WPL public when it is complete.

2.        To report back to Full Council on the report’s findings and, if the administration sees fit, to publish a delivery timetable.

3.        Approach Government to ensure as much match funding as possible, if decided a WPL is in Bristol’s interests.

4.    Write to WECA authorities to gauge their interests in developing their own WPL schemes.’

 

The Lord Mayor informed Full Council that the extended time limit for motions had been reached and he asked if there was a mover of a motion to further suspend standing orders to allow the meeting to proceed a further 25 minutes to hear the next motion.  There was no mover so no other motions were proposed.

Supporting documents: