Agenda item

Housing Ombudsman self-assessment

Minutes:

The Committee received a paper from the Business Innovation Manager (Housing and Landlord Services) regarding the Housing Ombudsman Complaint Handling Code of practice.

 

Members were informed that the Housing Ombudsman published a Complaint Handling Code which helped social landlords to respond to complaints effectively and fairly.  As part of the Code, social landlords must complete a self-assessment at least once every 12 months.  The most recent self-assessment had now been published on the Council’s website.

 

This looked at the Council’s performance between November 2020 and October 2021.

 

Key facts emphasised in the report were –

 

Of the 891 landlord service complaints received:

 

1.      90.6 percent were resolved at stage one, with 78.2 percent of these responded to within the 15-working day target, up 12 percent from last year.

 

2.      8.4 percent were resolved at stage two, with 84.6 percent of these responded to within the 20-working day target, up 17.6 percent from last year.

 

3.      Timescales were extended on 33 complaints.  There were good reasons for the extensions on 74.2 percent of cases and residents were kept informed about the extension before the target date on 54.5 percent of cases.

 

4.      35.7 percent of residents rated the overall resolution of their complaint as good or very good.

 

The paper also set out improvements that had been made in 2021 and improvements plans that were proposed for 2022.

 

Following discussion and in response to Members questions the following points were raised/clarified:

 

  1. A member asked if improved breakdown of complaints by equalities and community could be done to illustrate patterns of complaints more clearly eg Google pinpoint for visual presentation. The Business Innovation Manager there some limitations regarding what information could be provided, but officers would identify what could be done to meet members requests. Action Sarah Spicer          
  2. Regarding the categorisation of complaints, eg repairs, anti-social behaviour, it was noted that current systems inhibited the extraction of multiple and specific points of information however the Business Innovation Manager agreed to look at this to find out what could be done and what could not be done. Action Sarah Spicer          
  3. Members requested that, if possible, it would be useful to have more detailed information about complaints from targeted families. The Business Innovation Manager emphasised that complaints often reflected a wide variation of need however it was recognised that aligning complaints with the social profile of tenants would be beneficial and agreed to investigate if this could be done. Action Sarah Spicer       

 

Resolved –

 

That the Housing Ombudsman Complaint Handling Code paper and relevant comments made be noted.

The Committee received a paper from the Business Innovation Manager (Housing and Landlord Services) regarding the Housing Ombudsman Complaint Handling Code of practice.

 

Members were informed that the Housing Ombudsman published a Complaint Handling Code which helped social landlords to respond to complaints effectively and fairly.  As part of the Code, social landlords must complete a self-assessment at least once every 12 months.  The most recent self-assessment had now been published on the Council’s website.

 

This looked at the Council’s performance between November 2020 and October 2021.

 

Key facts emphasised in the report were –

 

Of the 891 landlord service complaints received:

 

5.      90.6 percent were resolved at stage one, with 78.2 percent of these responded to within the 15-working day target, up 12 percent from last year.

 

6.      8.4 percent were resolved at stage two, with 84.6 percent of these responded to within the 20-working day target, up 17.6 percent from last year.

 

7.      Timescales were extended on 33 complaints.  There were good reasons for the extensions on 74.2 percent of cases and residents were kept informed about the extension before the target date on 54.5 percent of cases.

 

8.      35.7 percent of residents rated the overall resolution of their complaint as good or very good.

 

The paper also set out improvements that had been made in 2021 and improvements plans that were proposed for 2022.

 

Following discussion and in response to Members questions the following points were raised/clarified:

 

  1. A member asked if improved breakdown of complaints by equalities and community could be done to illustrate patterns of complaints more clearly eg Google pinpoint for visual presentation. The Business Innovation Manager there some limitations regarding what information could be provided, but officers would identify what could be done to meet members requests. Action Sarah Spicer          
  2. Regarding the categorisation of complaints, eg repairs, anti-social behaviour, it was noted that current systems inhibited the extraction of multiple and specific points of information however the Business Innovation Manager agreed to look at this to find out what could be done and what could not be done. Action Sarah Spicer          
  3. Members requested that, if possible, it would be useful to have more detailed information about complaints from targeted families. The Business Innovation Manager emphasised that complaints often reflected a wide variation of need however it was recognised that aligning complaints with the social profile of tenants would be beneficial and agreed to investigate if this could be done. Action Sarah Spicer       

 

Resolved –

 

That the Housing Ombudsman Complaint Handling Code paper and relevant comments made be noted.

 

Supporting documents: