Agenda item

Motions

Note:

Under the Council’s constitution, 30 minutes are available for the consideration of motions. In practice, this realistically means that there is usually only time for one, or possibly two motions to be considered.

 

With the agreement of the Lord Mayor, motion 1 below will be considered at this meeting, and motion 2 is likely to be considered, subject to time.

 

Details of other motions submitted, (which, due to time constraints, are very unlikely to be considered at this meeting) are also set out for information.

 

MOTIONS RECEIVED FOR FULL COUNCIL

 

GOLDEN MOTION (GREEN): TACKLING KNIFE CRIME AND THE CAUSES OF KNIFE CRIME IN BRISTOL

 

Bristol City Council believes:

 

1.         Together with agency partners, we are working hard to address the causes of youth violence and trying to engage with young people to help them understand the devastating consequences carrying and using knives can have. This council believes that young people are important and recognises the positive contribution that young people make to the city. Bristol is working to support young people to make more positive choices when it comes to knife crime and youth violence. The impact of knife crime disproportionately impacts the BME communities of Bristol.

 

2.         Knife violence and the impact of violence has increased in recent years. The perception of the danger of knife crime, and fear for one’s loved ones has increased. In the year to end September 2022, there was a total of 1,204 incidents involving a sharp object. In that time there were 8 murders that involved a knife, constituting 42% of homicides with the Avon & Somerset area. In addition, there were 164 threats to kill, 12 attempts to kill, 33 rapes, and 597 serious assaults with a knife. [1]

 

3.         Injuries from knife violence increases in times of economic crisis and desperation. In January 2023, a man died in Castle Park due to knife violence, In February 2023, a woman was injured in a knife incident in Filton. One is one too many, and Bristol believes the victims of knife crime should be zero and that zero is possible.

 

4.         The causes of knife crime are complex but rooted in poverty and fostered by school exclusion. The solutions require cross agency working and flexible approaches.

 

Bristol City Council notes:

 

1.         The Safer Approach Strategy of 2021

 

2.         The Drug and Alcohol Strategy for Bristol 2021-2025 2021

 

3.         Bleed kits may be added to defibrillation units to provide public access in emergency situations.

 

4.         That our city centre public realm must be felt safe for all, with increased visibility and safety measures.

 

5.         That there are several areas of known hotspots in the city centre, where street furniture such as Bus stop advertisements create blind spots from view.

 

6.         That there are some great initiatives across our city run by people with lived experience, who are working to help our young people to avoid being groomed into causes of knife crime. However, some of these projects are unable to access formal routes of funding.

 

7.         That the route of many young people into the causes of knife crime starts with school exclusions, often due to unsupported needs.

 

8.         That the requirement to save in energy costs should not be to the detriment of personal security.

 

Bristol City Council resolves to:

 

1.         Assign more funding to the Safer Approach Strategy of 2021

 

2.         Assign more funding to the Drug and Alcohol Strategy for Bristol 2021-2025

 

3.         Work with stake holders to increase coverage of Bleed Kits and training on the use of them into night-time economy venues across the city.

 

4.         Request that the improvement plans for Castle Park are implemented as soon as the plans are finalised and fully consulted upon.

 

5.         Work together with relevant stakeholders to remove the causes of blind spots.

 

6.         Explore other routes of funding for grass roots projects tackling knife crime.

 

7.         Produce a strategy to tackle the negative views held by many of what it means to be neurodivergent so that all our young people can access the support they require. 

 

8.         Ensure street lighting and CCTV is installed, replaced & functioning in areas such as Lawrence Hill, Queens Square, Redcliffe & other known hotspots.

 

9.         Work together with local councillors, communities, police teams and the licensing team to identify licenced premises which fuel anti-social behaviours at the root of knife carrying and review the licence compliance.

 

10.       Request the Mayor and relevant Cabinet member to report back to Council on progress on these actions in March 2024.

 

 

Motion submitted by: Councillor Mohamed Makawi  (Green)

Date Submitted: 2 March 2023

 

Notes:

[1] Crime in England and Wales: Police Force Area data tables - Office for National Statistics (ons.gov.uk) (sept 2022 data set, table 5) 


 

SILVER MOTION (CONSERVATIVE) CHANGES TO DISTRICT CAR PARKS

 

“This Council very much regrets the decision to introduce changes in the terms and conditions for the use of the City’s district car parks and, as stated in the Cabinet report on this issue, to sell four additional sites deemed to have ‘low occupancy’ and appropriate for disposal. These proposals were not subject to any prior public consultation.

 

All identified car parks provide an important role in support of local shops and small businesses. Many serve vital public amenities such as GP surgeries, pharmacies, churches, and community centres.

 

Council believes such a move is misconceived, based on a flawed premise and methodology, whilst ignoring the needs and social benefits of retaining some free provision in our suburbs. The exclusion of local input from local people and their elected representatives dictates that it should be revisited, reviewed and reversed.

 

Accordingly, the Mayor is called upon to:

 

(i)         Listen to and acknowledge the strength of opposition to these ideas

(ii)        Commit to conducting full consultation prior to any introduction

(iii)       Work with local Councillors and communities to explore possible compromise solutions prior to implementation

(iv)       To pause the sell-off of the four secondary car parks to evaluate their impact on local high streets and then consult on those plans as well”

 

To be moved by Cllr Mark Weston (Conservative)

Date of Submission:  1st March 2023

Minutes:

Following a short adjournment, it was moved by the Lord Mayor that standing order CPR2.1(xi) be suspended to allow the meeting to go past the 30 minutes time limit for motions.  Following a vote, it was agreed to proceed up until 9.15pm.

GOLDEN MOTION (GREEN): TACKLING KNIFE CRIME AND THE CAUSES OF KNIFE CRIME IN BRISTOL

 

Councillor Mohammed Makawi moved the following motion:

 

Bristol City Council believes:

 

1. Together with agency partners, we are working hard to address the causes of youth violence and trying to engage with young people to help them understand the devastating consequences carrying and using knives can have. This council believes that young people are important and recognises the positive contribution that young people make to the city. Bristol is working to support young people to make more positive choices when it comes to knife crime and youth violence. The impact of knife crime disproportionately impacts the BME communities of Bristol.

 

2. Knife violence and the impact of violence has increased in recent years. The perception of the danger of knife crime, and fear for one’s loved ones has increased. In the year to end September 2022, there was a total of 1,204 incidents involving a sharp object. In that time there were 8 murders that involved a knife, constituting 42% of homicides with the Avon & Somerset area. In addition, there were 164 threats to kill, 12 attempts to kill, 33 rapes, and 597 serious assaults with a knife. [1]

 

3. Injuries from knife violence increases in times of economic crisis and desperation. In January 2023, a man died in Castle Park due to knife violence, In February 2023, a woman was injured in a knife incident in Filton. One is one too many, and Bristol believes the victims of knife crime should be zero and that zero is possible.

 

4. The causes of knife crime are complex but rooted in poverty and fostered by school exclusion. The solutions require cross agency working and flexible approaches.

 

Bristol City Council notes:

 

1. The Safer Approach Strategy of 2021

 

2. The Drug and Alcohol Strategy for Bristol 2021-2025 2021

 

3. Bleed kits may be added to defibrillation units to provide public access in emergency situations.

 

4. That our city centre public realm must be felt safe for all, with increased visibility and safety measures.

 

5. That there are several areas of known hotspots in the city centre, where street furniture such as Bus stop advertisements create blind spots from view.

 

6. That there are some great initiatives across our city run by people with lived experience, who are working to help our young people to avoid being groomed into causes of knife crime. However, some of these projects are unable to access formal routes of funding.

 

7. That the route of many young people into the causes of knife crime starts with school exclusions, often due to unsupported needs.

 

8. That the requirement to save in energy costs should not be to the detriment of personal security.

 

Bristol City Council resolves to:

 

1. Assign more funding to the Safer Approach Strategy of 2021

 

2. Assign more funding to the Drug and Alcohol Strategy for Bristol 2021-2025

 

3. Work with stake holders to increase coverage of Bleed Kits and training on the use of them into night-time economy venues across the city.

 

4. Request that the improvement plans for Castle Park are implemented as soon as the plans are finalised and fully consulted upon.

 

5. Work together with relevant stakeholders to remove the causes of blind spots.

 

6. Explore other routes of funding for grass roots projects tackling knife crime.

 

7. Produce a strategy to tackle the negative views held by many of what it means to be neurodivergent so that all our young people can access the support they require. 

 

8. Ensure street lighting and CCTV is installed, replaced & functioning in areas such as Lawrence Hill, Queens Square, Redcliffe & other known hotspots.

 

9. Work together with local councillors, communities, police teams and the licensing team to identify licenced premises which fuel anti-social behaviours at the root of knife carrying and review the licence compliance.

 

10. Request the Mayor and relevant Cabinet member to report back to Council on progress on these actions in March 2024.

 

The motion was seconded by Councillor Ani Stafford-Townsend.

 

Councillor Ellie King then moved the following amendment:

 

‘That the motion be amended to read as follows:

 

Bristol City Council believes:

 

1. Together with agency partners, we are working hard to address the causes of youth violence and trying to engage with young people to help them understand the devastating consequences carrying and using knives can have. This council believes that young people are important and recognises the positive contribution that young people make to the city. Bristol is working to support young people to make more positive choices when it comes to knife crime and youth violence. The impact of knife crime disproportionately impacts the BME communities of Bristol.

 

2. Knife violence and the impact of violence has increased in recent years. The perception of the danger of knife crime, and fear for one’s loved ones has increased. In the year to end September 2022, there was a total of 1,204 incidents involving a sharp object. In that time there were 8 murders that involved a knife, constituting 42% of homicides with the Avon & Somerset area. In addition, there were 164 threats to kill, 12 attempts to kill, 33 rapes, and 597 serious assaults with a knife. [1]

 

3. Injuries from knife violence increases in times of economic crisis and desperation. In January 2023, a man died in Castle Park due to knife violence, In February 2023, a woman was injured in a knife incident in Filton. One is one too many, and Bristol believes the victims of knife crime should be zero and that zero is possible.

 

4. The causes of knife crime are complex and multifaceted, and drivers can include the needs of the individual, their relationships, their wider community, their environment, societal factors including social media influence, and educational factors - including school exclusions. All these risks are often compounded by poverty and economic circumstances and disproportionately affect black and minoritized communities. The solutions require cross agency working and flexible approaches.

 

Bristol City Council notes:

 

1. The Safer Options approach, Keeping Bristol Safe Partnership, the Youth summit on Violence Reduction, Child Safeguarding Practice Review, Drugs in School Pathway, Education Inclusion Project, Community Guardianship, Safer Streets, the Belonging Strategy, safeguarding webinars for VCSE partners and disproportionality webinars for schools, as well as other projects, as part of the administration’s work to tackle youth violence.

 

2. Bleed kits may be added to defibrillation units to provide public access in emergency situations.

 

3. That our city’s public realm must be felt safe for all, with increased visibility and safety measures. The council is currently replacing streetlamps with LED bulbs, which improve visibility and can have the brightness increased when needed.

 

4. There are hotspots of concern in the city, where multi-agency interventions are needed to improve the safety of the environment

 

5. That there are some great initiatives across our city run by people with lived experience, who are working to help our young people to avoid being groomed into causes of knife crime. However, some of these projects are unable to access formal routes of funding.

 

6. The risk factors at the root of knife crime are complex. A contextual safeguarding approach is essential to tackling serious violence systemically and strategically.

           

Bristol City Council resolves to:

 

As part of the budget planning process for the next municipal year, call on councillors to assign more funding to the authorities’ early intervention and preventative measures, and continue to seek government grants to complement these strategies in the meantime.

 

1. Work with stake holders to increase coverage of Bleed Kits and training on the use of them into night-time economy venues across the city.

 

2. Request that the improvement plans for Castle Park are implemented as soon as the plans are finalised and fully consulted upon.

 

3. Work to produce a joint strategic needs assessment to define serious violence in Bristol. This assessment will form an evidence-led basis for the creation of both a local strategy and an Avon and Somerset-wide strategy, to tackle knife crime and other forms of serious violent crime.

 

4. Explore other routes of funding for grass roots projects tackling knife crime.

 

5. Work with city partners to tackle all the root causes of knife crime – such as by increasing support for at risk young people in the education system; engaging with community groups to improve their capacity to prevent serious violence; and improving the sharing of intelligence and information between agencies.

 

6. Invest £655,000 over the next two years to upgrade CCTV on council housing across the city and to also ensure street lighting and CCTV is installed, replaced & functioning in areas that are identified through the evidence-based joint strategic needs assessment.

 

7. Continue to work with the Bristol Nights Board and the wider Night Time Economy on preventive measures, noting the success of the harm reduction training, the Bristol Rules Campaign, anti-drink spiking kits, and the Women’s Safety Charter

 

8. Request the Keeping Bristol Safe Partnership feed into the Local Plan consultation, as a means to design blind spots and other factors relating to serious violence out of Bristol’s built environment.

 

9. Request the Mayor and relevant Cabinet member to report back to Council on progress on these actions in March 2024.

 

The amendment was seconded by Councillor Marley Bennet.

 

Following debate, upon being put to the vote, the amendment was CARRIED (35 For, 20 Against, 0 Abstentions).

 

The Lord Mayor then invited Councillor Makawi, as mover of the original motion to speak.

 

Following final remarks, upon being put to the vote, the amended motion was CARRIED (55 For, 0 against, 0 abstentions) and it was

 

RESOLVED:

 

Bristol City Council believes:

 

1. Together with agency partners, we are working hard to address the causes of youth violence and trying to engage with young people to help them understand the devastating consequences carrying and using knives can have. This council believes that young people are important and recognises the positive contribution that young people make to the city. Bristol is working to support young people to make more positive choices when it comes to knife crime and youth violence. The impact of knife crime disproportionately impacts the BME communities of Bristol.

 

2. Knife violence and the impact of violence has increased in recent years. The perception of the danger of knife crime, and fear for one’s loved ones has increased. In the year to end September 2022, there was a total of 1,204 incidents involving a sharp object. In that time there were 8 murders that involved a knife, constituting 42% of homicides with the Avon & Somerset area. In addition, there were 164 threats to kill, 12 attempts to kill, 33 rapes, and 597 serious assaults with a knife. [1]

 

3. Injuries from knife violence increases in times of economic crisis and desperation. In January 2023, a man died in Castle Park due to knife violence, In February 2023, a woman was injured in a knife incident in Filton. One is one too many, and Bristol believes the victims of knife crime should be zero and that zero is possible.

 

4. The causes of knife crime are complex and multifaceted, and drivers can include the needs of the individual, their relationships, their wider community, their environment, societal factors including social media influence, and educational factors - including school exclusions. All these risks are often compounded by poverty and economic circumstances and disproportionately affect black and minoritized communities. The solutions require cross agency working and flexible approaches.

 

Bristol City Council notes:

 

1. The Safer Options approach, Keeping Bristol Safe Partnership, the Youth summit on Violence Reduction, Child Safeguarding Practice Review, Drugs in School Pathway, Education Inclusion Project, Community Guardianship, Safer Streets, the Belonging Strategy, safeguarding webinars for VCSE partners and disproportionality webinars for schools, as well as other projects, as part of the administration’s work to tackle youth violence.

 

2. Bleed kits may be added to defibrillation units to provide public access in emergency situations.

 

3. That our city’s public realm must be felt safe for all, with increased visibility and safety measures. The council is currently replacing streetlamps with LED bulbs, which improve visibility and can have the brightness increased when needed.

 

4. There are hotspots of concern in the city, where multi-agency interventions are needed to improve the safety of the environment

 

5. That there are some great initiatives across our city run by people with lived experience, who are working to help our young people to avoid being groomed into causes of knife crime. However, some of these projects are unable to access formal routes of funding.

 

6. The risk factors at the root of knife crime are complex. A contextual safeguarding approach is essential to tackling serious violence systemically and strategically.

           

Bristol City Council resolves to:

 

As part of the budget planning process for the next municipal year, call on councillors to assign more funding to the authorities’ early intervention and preventative measures, and continue to seek government grants to complement these strategies in the meantime.

 

1. Work with stake holders to increase coverage of Bleed Kits and training on the use of them into night-time economy venues across the city.

 

2. Request that the improvement plans for Castle Park are implemented as soon as the plans are finalised and fully consulted upon.

 

3. Work to produce a joint strategic needs assessment to define serious violence in Bristol. This assessment will form an evidence-led basis for the creation of both a local strategy and an Avon and Somerset-wide strategy, to tackle knife crime and other forms of serious violent crime.

 

4. Explore other routes of funding for grass roots projects tackling knife crime.

 

5. Work with city partners to tackle all the root causes of knife crime – such as by increasing support for at risk young people in the education system; engaging with community groups to improve their capacity to prevent serious violence; and improving the sharing of intelligence and information between agencies.

 

6. Invest £655,000 over the next two years to upgrade CCTV on council housing across the city and to also ensure street lighting and CCTV is installed, replaced & functioning in areas that are identified through the evidence-based joint strategic needs assessment.

 

7. Continue to work with the Bristol Nights Board and the wider Night Time Economy on preventive measures, noting the success of the harm reduction training, the Bristol Rules Campaign, anti-drink spiking kits, and the Women’s Safety Charter

 

8. Request the Keeping Bristol Safe Partnership feed into the Local Plan consultation, as a means to design blind spots and other factors relating to serious violence out of Bristol’s built environment.

 

9. Request the Mayor and relevant Cabinet member to report back to Council on progress on these actions in March 2024.

 

--

 

SILVER MOTION (CONSERVATIVE) CHANGES TO DISTRICT CAR PARKS

 

Councillor Jonathan Hucker moved the following  motion:

 

“This Council very much regrets the decision to introduce changes in the terms and conditions for the use of the City’s district car parks and, as stated in the Cabinet report on this issue, to sell four additional sites deemed to have ‘low occupancy’ and appropriate for disposal. These proposals were not subject to any prior public consultation.

 

All identified car parks provide an important role in support of local shops and small businesses. Many serve vital public amenities such as GP surgeries, pharmacies, churches, and community centres.

 

Council believes such a move is misconceived, based on a flawed premise and methodology, whilst ignoring the needs and social benefits of retaining some free provision in our suburbs. The exclusion of local input from local people and their elected representatives dictates that it should be revisited, reviewed and reversed.

 

Accordingly, the Mayor is called upon to:

 

(i)         Listen to and acknowledge the strength of opposition to these ideas

(ii)        Commit to conducting full consultation prior to any introduction

(iii)       Work with local Councillors and communities to explore possible compromise solutions prior to implementation

(iv)       To pause the sell-off of the four secondary car parks to evaluate their impact on local high streets and then consult on those plans as well”

 

Councillor Sharon Scott seconded the motion.

 

Councillor Ed Plowden then moved the following amendment:

 

‘That the motion be amended to read as follows:

 

SILVER MOTION (CONSERVATIVE) CHANGES TO DISTRICT CAR PARKS

 

This Council notes the decision to introduce changes in the terms and conditions for the use of the City’s district car parks and, as stated in the Cabinet report on this issue, to sell four additional sites deemed to have ‘low occupancy’ and appropriate for disposal.

 

Council notes these proposals were not subject to specific prior public consultation.

 

Council notes that transport of all types plays a vital role in support of local shops and small businesses, many of which are within a 15 minute walk or cycle of the local community they serve.

 

Council notes that many older and disabled people currently rely on their private cars to access vital public amenities such as local shops GP surgeries, pharmacies, churches, and community centres.

 

However, this Council also notes that the Citizens Assembly top recommendation is that parking should be progressively reduced through the City as a key tool in tackling the Climate Emergency.

 

This Council believes parking is part of a market in mobility and needs to be used as a tool as part of a balanced transport policy and that the often-promised parking strategy for the City is much needed and severely overdue.

 

This Council believes that this would allow the input from local people and their elected representatives at a strategic level to determine the needs of parking in all areas of the City.

Council believes that a full consultation involving older and disabled people and non-users of these car parks should be undertaken, and that it should include consulting on alternative uses of the land proposed to be sold.

 

Accordingly, the Mayor is called upon to:

(i) Listen to and acknowledge opposition to these ideas

(ii) Commit to conducting consultation prior to the introduction of parking fees

(iii) Work with local Councillors and communities to explore possible compromise solutions prior to implementation

 

The amendment was seconded by Councillor Heather Mack.

 

Following debate, upon being put to the vote, the amendment was REJECTED (20 For, 34 Against, 0 Abstentions).

 

The Lord Mayor then invited Councillor Hucker, as mover of the original motion to speak.

 

Following final remarks, upon being put to the vote, the original motion was REJECTED (19 For, 35 against, 0 abstentions).

Supporting documents: