Agenda item

Motions

Note:

Under the Council’s constitution, 30 minutes are available for the consideration of motions. In practice, this realistically means that there is usually only time for one, or possibly two motions to be considered.

 

With the agreement of the Lord Mayor, motion 1 below will be considered at this meeting, and motion 2 is likely to be considered, subject to time.

 

Details of other motions submitted, (which, due to time constraints, are very unlikely to be considered at this meeting) are also set out for information.

 

MOTIONS RECEIVED FOR FULL COUNCIL

 

 

 

1. Golden Motion - Homelessness and Immigration Rules

 

  1. This council notes the Government Immigration Rules published on 22 October 2020, coming into effect on 1 December 2020 which made rough sleeping grounds for refusing or cancelling a person’s leave to remain in the UK.

 

  1. This council further notes the implementation guidance published by the Government on 20 April 2021 which clarifies how the rules will be implemented

 

  1. This council welcomes Bristol’s status as a City of Sanctuary and the work the administration is doing to make Bristol a welcoming place for refugees.

 

  1. This council welcomes the Labour administration’s work to reduce rough sleeping by 80% since 2016.

 

  1. This council welcomes the Labour administration’s introduction of Bristol Street Outreach – a new service to help accelerate the Council’s work to end rough sleeping in Bristol.
  2. This council welcomes the government’s ongoing commitment to end rough sleeping by 2024.

 

This council believes

  1. In order to end rough sleeping, people experiencing homelessness must be able to confidently approach local services provided by this council and its commissioned partners.

 

  1. That the immigration rules as proposed will dissuade many people facing homelessness from accessing those services for fear that their details will be passed to immigration authorities and that this will lead to an increase in rough sleeping

This council therefore pledges

  1. Subject to the circumstances of each individual case, in order to assist the national effort to end rough sleeping we will make no direct referrals under the rough sleeping Immigration Rules.

 

  1. The council will also not require any of our commissioned partners to make referrals or pass data to the Home Office under the Immigration rules.

 

  1. The council will only share information and data with the Home Office with the explicit and informed consent of the individual.

 

  1. To display this commitment prominently in public areas and on our website and to inform those organisations that we work with (commissioned and non-commissioned) who make referrals to us of this policy.

 

  1. To join Homeless Links’s #SupportDontDeport campaign and allow our logo to be identified with that campaign.

Motion to be moved by: Councillor Tom Renhard (Labour Group)

 

 

2. LGBT+ Mental Health Protection

 

Full Council notes that:

  1. Under the Equalities Act 2010, Bristol City Council has a legal duty to combat discrimination and promote equality.
  2. That the Council’s Equality Strategy 2018-2023 establishes the principles that the Council will work “with residents and employers to create communities which are able to come together, value diversity and challenge discrimination”
  3. That a 2018 Stonewall Report on health among LGBT+ people states that over half of LGBT+ people (52%) experienced depression in the previous year.
  4. The same report states that one in eight LGBT+ people aged 18-24 (13 per cent) said they’ve attempted to take their own life in the previous year.
  5. A 2016 Bristol LGBT+ Health & Wellbeing Needs Survey commissioned by Bristol Healthwatch found that 61% of participants had sought help for anxiety or depression, and that 32% of respondents had hurt or injured themselves in an act of self harm.
  6. Gay and Bisexual men are 4 times more likely to attempt suicide across their lifetime than the rest of the population.
  7. Black, Asian or Minority Ethnic (BAME) LGBT+ face additional barriers, with 18% experiencing difficulties trying to access healthcare services, and 62% experience depression.
  8. Young LGBT+ persons are particularly affected, with data from the Queer Futures 2016 study stating that over 70% of young LGBT+ people experienced discrimination, bullying, rejection, physical and verbal violence, threats and/or other forms of marginalisation related to their sexual orientation and gender identity.
  9. Older LGBT+ people also face discrimination or choose to re-enter the closet when, for example, accessing heath and care provision in older age.
  10. One in seven LGBT+ people (14 per cent) avoid seeking healthcare for fear of discrimination from staff.
  11. Almost one in four LGBT+ people (23 per cent) have witnessed discriminatory or negative remarks against LGBT+ people by healthcare staff. In the last year alone, six per cent of LGBT+ people – including 20 per cent of trans people – have witnessed these remarks.
  12. These trends are often more marked in the experiences of trans people.
  13. The pandemic has likely made it more difficult for LGBT+ people to have access to mental health support, who may have been trapped in circumstances where they have been unable to fully express themselves.

 

Full Council believes;

  1. In the equality of all people regardless of their sexual orientation or gender identity.
  2. That mental health treatment should have parity with physical health treatment.
  3. That greater support is required for LGBT+ people suffering from mental health conditions than they are currently receiving.

 

Full Council resolves to:

  1. Ask the Head of Equality & Inclusion to ensure that within the Council itself, a robust set of processes are created through our staff led groups and trade unions to protect the mental health of LGBT+ council staff.
  2. Carry out a survey of Bristol LGBT+ residents to assess the current issues around health within the LGBT+ Community, similar to the 2016 Bristol LGBT+ Health & Wellbeing Needs Survey
  3. Work with our partners across the city, other Equalities Charter signatories, and the large range of LGBT+ charities working within mental health across Bristol to create a strategic plan for improving the mental health of the LGBT+ community.
  4. Work with local charities and our city partners promote services available to LGBT+ persons for assistance with their mental health.
  5. Ask the Cabinet Member for Education to write to all the governing bodies, proprietors (of academy chains), headteachers and principals of every school across the city to offer the Council’s support in delivering greater levels of LGBT+ mental health support in our schools.

 

Motion to be moved by: Cllr Alex Hartley

 

 

3. Democracy Motion

 

This Council notes plans by the Conservative Government to replace the Supplementary Vote system used to elect Mayors, Metro Mayors and Police and Crime Commissioners with First Past The Post.

This Council also notes the Government’s plans to bring in compulsory photo ID for people wanting to vote, well aware that three and a half million people in this country do not have any photo ID.

This Council also congratulates the Welsh Sennedd for passing the Local Government and Elections (Wales) Bill on 21 January this year which delivers the following:

  • The right of Local Councils to scrap First Past the Post and instead elect Councillors using the Single Transferable Vote
  • Votes at 16 - extending the franchise to 16 and 17 year olds and to all foreign citizens legally resident in Wales.
  • Automatic Voter Registration - The bill also paves the way for an overhaul of Wales’ outdated and ineffective system of voter registration. The bill could lead to a new system where registration officers can identify people missing from the register and let them know they’ll be added.

English voters are already disadvantaged compared to voters in Northern Ireland, where STV has been used to elect Councils for decades, Scotland, where the same move was made in 2007, and now Wales is making the same changes.

This Council agrees to join the campaign by the Electoral Reform Society to demand the same rights for English voters that are already enjoyed by voters in Northern Ireland where STV has been used for years, Scotland, where STV came in for Council elections in 2007 and in Wales where Councils will, inevitably, make the move to fair voting.

This Council also commits to working with other Councils, Core Cities, Mayors and Metro Mayors and others to:

·       Oppose the scrapping of the Supplementary Vote system that ensures more votes count;

·       Oppose the introduction of compulsory photo ID for voters

·       Demand new legislation to allow:

?         English Councils to switch to STV if they so chose

?         Votes at 16

?         Automatic Voter Registration

Finally this Council calls on all UK political parties to embrace electoral reform for all elections so everyone can vote for the candidates or parties they truly believe in safe in the knowledge that their vote will always count.

Motion to be moved by: Councillor Fabian Breckels (Labour Group)

 

 

4. Enforcement of City’s Byelaws

 

 “This Council notes that relatively recently (14th March 2017), a whole new set of byelaws were adopted to modernise the pre-existing set of regulations some of which dated from the Victorian era, and better protect the city’s parks and green spaces.  These remain incredibly important as a means of prohibiting and preventing a range of anti-social behaviours which if left unchecked can ruin the quiet enjoyment of public leisure land.

 However, since that time, it has become clear that there are growing problems in the operation and absence of implementation of these rules.  Members are regularly called upon to deal with complaints around such things as fly-tipping, littering, nuisance parking, damage caused by the unlawful riding of motorbikes, impromptu barbecues and casual vandalism.

 Accordingly, Council calls upon the Mayor to take a much tougher line in the enforcement of these rules through the Magistrates Courts, and for him to explore the option of reintroducing the lost and lamented local government role of ‘park ranger/keeper’.  These officers provided an invaluable function including acting as a visible presence in wards; helping to deter undesirable activity; were a source of local intelligence; and served as an easy contact point within the Authority whenever problems did arise in their areas of responsibility.”

Motion to be moved by: Councillor Mark Weston (Conservative Group)

 

 

5. Growing Provision of Allotments Across The City

 

“This Council recognises the long-established benefits derived from the provision of small agricultural holdings and allotments to individuals and families.  These sites give people the chance to take productive exercise and grow cheap food but, also, are valued for other reasons such as providing educational opportunities, help to build communities and offer some protection to the local environment.

 Council notes the commitment previously given by the Mayor to have community gardens and allotments in every ward’ but is anxious to ensure that such rhetoric translates into action.

 Recently, the Authority had 497 vacancies with a waiting list of 5665 people. Council is concerned that much suitable land held by the Authority for this purpose is either underutilised or could be de-registered for development, ironically, when there is likely to be a growing desire and demand to maintain an allotment.

 Accordingly, Council calls on the Mayor to pledge to preserve, protect and promote existing sites; to increase the size of this network; extend the number which are accorded (limited) ‘statutory’ protection under current legislation; and ensure that all those who want access to a plot, are able to do so.”

Motion to be moved by Councillor Graham Morris (Conservative Group)

 

 

6.  Enhanced Protection of The Green Belt

 

  “This Council welcomes the Government’s recent recognition of the public consultation which has been received to the first stage of its reform of the Planning system.  Of particular importance is the proposed strengthening of the status afforded to the statutory Green Belt following the efforts of such bodies as the Campaign for the Protection of Rural England.

 Council is especially pleased to learn of the increased emphasis placed on redevelopment of ‘brownfield’ and previously used sites in urban centres, rather than ‘eating’ into our surrounding fields, farmland and countryside.

 Partly in response to this announcement but also to reflect the substantial level of local opposition shown in public consultation, Council resolves to amend its draft Bristol Local Plan to delete the proposed de-registration of Green Belt protection within the South Bristol Link Road, in Bedminster Down and Highridge.

 One practical consequence of this change will be the deletion of the proposed planned approval for the construction of 200 properties near Yew Tree Farm and 150 properties near Elsbert Drive.”

Motion to be moved by Councillor Kevin Quartley (Conservative Group)

 

 

7. Mobilise community investments to tackle climate change

 

Full Council notes:

1.      That this council unanimously declared a climate emergency in November 2018 following a Green Motion to Council

2.      The motion committed the city to achieve net zero carbon impact by 2030 and there are now under 10 years left to this target date

3.      The council has been progressing a package of low carbon opportunities called City Leap since May 2018. City Leap is still subject to a procurement process since a new process was started in 2020 and the role it will play in decarbonisation of the city is not yet known.

4.      A new low risk model called Community Municipal Investments [CMI] has been developed by Leeds University and Abundance Investments platform with UK Government and EU support. This concept had the support of 4 local authorities including Bristol City Council. [1]

5.      This model of green bonds with a local authority guarantee is proven to mobilise local and other investment and channels local savings into local projects with low risk and a modest return to investors [2] and after the first issue further calls can be automated. The Local Government Association presents it as a model for mobilising widespread private investment to decarbonise localities.

 

Full Council believes:

1.      That offering local savers and other ethical investors a way to support the city’s journey to carbon neutrality mobilises community engagement in the process of change, attracts significant sums for named projects, and should be developed. 72% of people want to lend savings to help councils develop Climate Emergency Plans [3]

2.      That offering security and a modest rate of interest through municipal bonds is an established way to develop local infrastructure [4]. This complements other projects such as the successful Bristol Energy Cooperative.

3.      That CMIs can help us amass funds on a regular basis develop a series of practical projects for a low carbon transition now in partnership with others which will be popular with local savers. This mobilises capital that could otherwise leave the city.

4.      While CMIs are floated as possible way that might be used in the city to help fund the energy upgrade of community buildings in the SONNET project [see 5]  no actual CMIs are yet planned.

5.      The Mayor should prioritise CMIs as part of the package of investments that will create positive economic opportunities and carbon neutrality while building community wealth.

6.      Bristol should join the other 3 pioneers of CMI in developing local opportunities for local investors [e.g. 6]. In 3 months about £1m funds can be collected for investment and this can be repeated periodically. 

 

 

Full Council resolves:

  1. To call on the Mayor to begin development of Community Municipal Investments for the city.
  2. That the Mayor promote CMI as a way residents and institutions can be engaged and actively involved in contributing to a zero carbon city.
  3. To request officers to identify carbon saving projects suited to CMI investment in conjunction with city partners.

 

Motion to be moved by: Cllr Martin Fodor, Redland ward Green Party

 

References:

  1. The report supported by Bristol: https://baumaninstitute.leeds.ac.uk/research/financing-for-society/
  2. Initial proposed interest rate is 1.2%. See: Your questions answered on Green Community Bonds | Abundance Blog
    https://medium.abundanceinvestment.com/community-municipal-investments-your-questions-answered-25218ed4d2cb
  3. Survey by One Poll, 2020, cited by the Local Government Association.
  4. https://medium.abundanceinvestment.com/community-municipal-investments-the-new-option-for-your-low-risk-money-a9cc5d72e03a?source=post_internal_links---------1------------------
  5. Survey of community groups underway in the city – see SONNET – The Bristol City Lab – Bristol Energy Network
  6. These are: Leeds Council, Warrington, and West Berkshire. Eg Invest now: https://info.westberks.gov.uk/wbcmi; https://www.abundanceinvestment.com/invest-now/warrington-2025

 

 

8. A Universal Basic Income Trial for Bristol

 

Full Council notes

1.      The drastic impacts of the Covid pandmic on employment and household incomes in the city;

2.      The threat to income and employment from automation and artificial intelligence, which could affect a great many more jobs in future;

3.      The development of universal basic income (UBI) trials in other countries, which offer a non-means-tested sum paid by the state to cover the basic cost of living, which is paid to all citizens individually, regardless of employment status, wealth, or marital status, which has been widely debated in recent months;

4.      That a trial of UBI was promised by the Labour party had the party won the last general election;

5.      The resolutions of other local authorities including Sheffield, Birmingham. Lewes,  and Brighton and Hove [with cross party support] calling for trials of UBI;

6.      A network of Universal Basic Income Labs has been set up and works with local authorities across the UK developing UBI proposals to address problems such as poverty, inequality, discrimination and environmental damage, long-term and immediately, in relation to coronavirus. One is operating in Bristol.

7.      Birmingham City Council has issued a briefing on UBI[i]

8.      UBI has been Green Party Policy since about 1973 and more recently taken up by other parties[ii]

 

Full Council believes:

1.      That the current benefit system is failing citizens, with Universal Credit causing hardship to many communities

2.      A UBI is the fairest, most effective way to mitigate the effects of coronavirus on people’s incomes as it does not discriminate between employment status, caring responsibilities, age, or disability when providing basic support;

3.      There is a danger of increasing numbers of people facing poverty as a result of the coronavirus crisis; 

4.      Testing a UBI is needed, as a UBI has the potential to help address key challenges such as inequality, poverty, precarious employment, loss of community, and breach of planetary boundaries through: 

                    i.            Giving employers a more flexible workforce whilst giving employees greater freedom to change their jobs; 

                   ii.            Valuing unpaid work, such as caring for family members and voluntary work; 

                 iii.            Removing the negative impacts of benefit sanctions and conditionality;  

                 iv.            Giving people more equal resources within the family, workplace and society; 

                   v.            Breaking the link between work and consumption, thus helping reduce strain on the environment in line with the One City Climate Strategy; 

                 vi.            Enabling greater opportunities for people to work in community and cultural activities or to train or reskill in areas that will be needed to transition to a lower-carbon economy. 

5.      The success of a UBI pilot should not be measured only by impact upon take-up of paid work, but also the impact upon communities and what the people within them do, how they feel, and how they relate to others and the environment around them; and 

6.      Given its history of social innovation, wealth of expertise, and active networks across community, business and public services, Bristol is ideally placed to pilot a UBI. 

 

This council calls on the Mayor to:

1.      Send a joint letter with the other party leaders to the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, the leader of the party in Government, their counterparts in all opposition political parties in parliament, all local MPs, asking for a trial of Universal Basic Income in the city citing the above reasons.

 

Motion to be moved by: Martin Fodor (Green Group)

 

[i]Birmingham City Council’s official UBI briefing - see
https://birmingham.cmis.uk.com/Birmingham/Document.ashx?czJKcaeAi5tUFL1DTL2UE4zNRBcoShgo=nb28HJzZZy8R6UE9qsv3LHJckreeBwn50Tbzg0riXhiHQcf3zr1WGQ%3D%3D&rUzwRPf%2BZ3zd4E7Ikn8Lyw%3D%3D=pwRE6AGJFLDNlh225F5QMaQWCtPHwdhUfCZ%2FLUQzgA2uL5jNRG4jdQ%3D%3D&mCTIbCubSFfXsDGW9IXnlg%3D%3D=hFflUdN3100%3D&kCx1AnS9%2FpWZQ40DXFvdEw%3D%3D=hFflUdN3100%3D&uJovDxwdjMPoYv%2BAJvYtyA%3D%3D=ctNJFf55vVA%3D&FgPlIEJYlotS%2BYGoBi5olA%3D%3D=NHdURQburHA%3D&d9Qjj0ag1Pd993jsyOJqFvmyB7X0CSQK=ctNJFf55vVA%3D&WGewmoAfeNR9xqBux0r1Q8Za60lavYmz=ctNJFf55vVA%3D&WGewmoAfeNQ16B2MHuCpMRKZMwaG1PaO=ctNJFf55vVA%3D&fbclid=IwAR3v5XWzNYc_KENecR4_O6k4xSFL847QcMyKppBD6IUO5x2gLp5E3GdI3_M

 

[ii]https://www.bristol247.com/opinion/your-say/otherpartieswillriudiculegreenpolicies/

 

 

9.      Liveable Neighbourhoods for Bristol.

Full Council notes:

 

  1. that streets in Bristol are often affected by rat-running, speeding vehicles, congestion, and pollution;
  2. residential streets across the city are frequently hostile places for children, older residents, and those with disabilities, yet the council has declared an aim to be an age friendly, child friendly, and inclusive city and has declared climate and ecological emergencies;
  3. redesigning our streets and neighbourhoods can create a healthier, safer, greener, and less stressful and more peaceful environment;
  4. progress to make neighbourhoods more liveable is underway in many cities in Britain and other countries; officers regard it as a proven concept.
  5. there are groups in many parts of the city campaigning for liveable neighbourhoods, with a citywide Liveable Neighbourhoods for Bristol [ref 1] campaign supported by 38 groups representing a wide range of needs and interests ;
  6. the council has recently consulted on several innovative proposals for better street space in specific high streets and rat runs on ‘Bristol Citizenspace’ which may incorporate many of the same features as liveable neighbourhoods;
  7. the basic features of liveable neighbourhoods are to filter out rat running and through traffic across an area, and to enable safer movement by active travel, as well as the introduction of facilities for local people such as pocket parks, seating, shelter, nature, while maintaining essential access throughout;
  8. in liveable neighbourhoods there is evidence that lives are healthier, overall levels of motor traffic reduce while active travel increases; emergency vehicles are consulted and do not report delays;
  9. streets can become more favourable for young families, children, older people and disabled people once there is less through traffic;
  10. support for liveable neighbourhoods has already been declared by the current Mayor and the Labour administration [ref 2] Greens [ref 3], and many other organisations [ref 4] but a strategy does not yet exist to implement them and only two pilots are proposed.

 

 

Full Council believes that:

  1. developing liveable neighbourhoods can help tackle many of the problems affecting streets across the city and assist many local traders, hospitality and cultural organisations affected by the pandemic;
  2. a participatory and inclusive process is needed to inform solutions and deal with many issues in different neighbourhoods, addressing inequalities in streets and different parts of the city, just as with the street space consultation process underway; there are many myths [ref 5] and engagement is needed to discuss and dispel these;
  3. area based solutions are needed [to avoid traffic and parking displacement] and concerns about essential access, deliveries, disabled parking, and space for local traders has to be informed by evidence and examples from elsewhere, but there is no uniform model that should be imposed on areas of the city;
  4. a mix of different facilities, layouts, amenities and traffic management options can be trialled and adopted to create liveable neighbourhoods depending on local needs, preferences and opportunities, eg to incorporate school streets.

 

 

Full council calls on the Mayor to:

  1. commit to making Bristol a city of liveable neighbourhoods during his term; 
  2. build on the streetspace projects by working with residents and stakeholders across the city to enable residents and other partners to work together with council support to develop and trial liveable neighbourhoods; this can ensure progress is widespread but all communities get the support they need to benefit.
  3. identify budgets [such as community infrastructure levy], support, and facilities that could be used to progress the introduction of liveable neighbourhoods in conjunction with government and WECA funds for active travel, play, and COVID recovery.

 

Motion to be moved by: Cllr Martin Fodor (Green Group)

 

Ref

1. https://liveablebristol.org.uk/

2. https://thebristolmayor.com/2020/11/23/liveable-neighbourhoods/?fbclid=IwAR1yaEvgRknvDcRE0m3VhWUVlaRynNLIzPRhvpFdQuemK82E8RxjFgtBxNM

3. https://sandy4mayor.co.uk/flourishing-bristol-liveable-neighbourhoods/?fbclid=IwAR1U3agx41GFfPxwMvxjdIaW206t6IripFfDcOkvAsRbgJU1PYG1sTflpgI 

4. https://bristolcycling.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2020/08/LNfB-Open-Letter.pdf 

5. for instance these eight relating to low traffic neighbourhoods: https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/nov/16/mythbusters-eight-common-objections-to-ltns-and-why-they-are-wrong



10. This Council supports the Climate and Ecological Emergency Bill

 

Full Council notes that:

 

  • Humans have already caused irreversible climate change, the impacts of which are being felt in the UK and around the world.  Global temperatures have increased by 1.2°C from pre-industrial levels and the natural world has reached crisis point, with 28% of plants and animals currently threatened with extinction.

  • Unless we drastically change course, the world is set to exceed the Paris Agreement’s safe 1.5°C limit. Pledges like the Paris Agreement and updated emissions targets are not legally binding.  The gap between pledges and policies leaves the world on course for catastrophic warming of near 3%.  As the 2018 report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) made clear, every half a degree makes a world of difference: severe climate impacts with 1.5°C of warming, such as extreme weather patterns causing flooding and heat waves, get significantly worse with 2°C.  According to the IPCC, limiting heating to 1.5°C may still be possible with ambitious action from national and sub-national authorities, civil society, the private sector and local communities.  

  • The UK is one of the most nature-depleted countries in the world and more than one in seven of our plants and animals face extinction and more than 40% are in decline.  We have lost 95% of our hedgehogs.  The UK needs a legally-enforceable nature target so that by 2030 nature is visibly and measurably on the path of recovery, in line with the Global Goal for Nature and the Leaders' Pledge for Nature.

 

Full Council recognises that:

  • This Council has already declared Climate and Ecological emergencies, as have hundreds of other local authorities, and many councils are now taking steps to achieve net zero carbon emissions, and to protect and revitalise local wildlife and natural habitats.

  • However, as noted in Bristol’s Climate Emergency motion in November 2018, Government must provide more powers and funding to make the city’s 2030 carbon neutral target possible.

  • In May 2019 Parliament declared an Environment and Climate Emergency, supported by opposition MPs. However, to date this has not been endorsed by Government, nor has the Government developed a strategy that adequately addresses these emergencies.

 

  • As the UK prepares to host the UN COP26 climate conference this Autumn, our country needs to show stronger leadership on the environment.

 

  • As the first European local authority to declare a Climate Emergency, a ‘Race to Zero’ city and a key city in the C40-MMC Global Mayors Task Force on Climate and Migration, Bristol is ideally placed to lead and inspire the rest of the UK to take urgent action on the Climate and Ecological Emergencies.

 

  • There is a Bill before Parliament—the Climate and Ecological Emergency Bill (published as the “Climate and Ecology Bill”), which, if it became law, would require the government to develop a strategy to address the emergency that would ensure:

o   the ecological emergency is tackled shoulder to shoulder with the climate crisis in a joined-up approach;

o   the Paris Agreement is enshrined into law to ensure that UK does its real fair share to limit global temperature rise to the most stringent end of the Paris agreement -1.5°C. 

o   the Leaders Pledge for Nature is enshrined into law to ensure that the UK’s ecosystems are protected and restored with a focus on biodiversity, soils and natural carbon sinks;

o   the UK takes full responsibility for our entire greenhouse gas footprint (ie consumption emissions plus shipping, flights and land-based transport) by accounting for all of the emissions that take place overseas to manufacture, transport and dispose of the goods and services we import and consume;

o   the UK takes full responsibility for our ecological footprint so that we protect health and resilience of ecosystems along both domestic and our global supply chains;

o   an independent, temporary Climate and Nature Assembly is set-up, representative of the UK’s population, to engage with the UK Parliament and UK Government to help develop the emergency strategy.

 

Full Council therefore resolves to ask the Mayor or Cabinet lead to:

  • Support the Climate and Ecological Emergency Bill;

 

  • Inform the local media of this decision;

 

  • Write an open letter to Bristol’s four MPs (shared with our residents through local and social media) urging them to sign up to support the Bill, or thanking them for doing so; and

 

 

 

Motion to be moved by: Councillor Carla Denyer (Green Group)

 

 

11. Public toilet provision in Bristol

 

Full Council notes that:

  1. The council closed 18 public toilets in 2018.
  2. Councillors received a petition in May from the bus drivers’ union demanding better access to public toilets.
  3. During the national lockdown, the community toilet scheme was unavailable because the included businesses were mandated to remain closed.
  4. Community toilets are located within businesses which have restricted opening hours.
  5. Many community toilets are within premises which serve alcohol, making them inaccessible to Muslims.
  6. Access to public sanitation is a feminist issue, a disabilities issue, and a homelessness issue.
  7. It is illegal to urinate or defecate in public.
  8. The community toilet scheme provides a large number of additional toilets to be used by the public across Bristol, which is a welcome addition.

 

Full Council believes that:

  1. Current provision of public toilets is inadequate to the extent that the council is failing in our public sanitation responsibilities and our human rights duties.
  2. The community toilets scheme is inadequate specifically due to the difference in nature of a public toilet block from a private restaurant or bar.

 

Full Council resolves to call on the Mayor and Cabinet:

  1. To urgently engage with the bus drivers’ union in resolving their specific needs relating to accessing toilets during their workday.
  2. Within the community toilets scheme, to ensure a reasonable provision of toilets which are not inside venues selling alcohol.
  3. To commit increased funds in the next budget for managing a sufficient distribution of council-managed public toilet blocks such that the public feel able to travel about the city on foot for long periods of time and be confident that they will encounter reasonable numbers of public conveniences on their journeys at any time of day.

 

Motion to be moved by: Cllr Jenny Bartle  (Green Group)

 

 

12. Skate provision in Central Bristol

 

Full Council notes that:

  1. Bristol is an important city in the international skate scene, drawing skaters from across the world wishing to skate here.
  2. Bristol actively seeks to be an international creative world leader.
  3. Bristol is also dedicated to being an inclusive city for all diversities, ages, cultures, beliefs and accessibility needs.
  4. As a city we have limited funds.

 

Full Council believes that:

  1. Free outside activities open to all are always to be encouraged, and in the time of covid-19 are crucial to the health of our city.
  2. Carrots tend to be more effective than sticks, and that we must bring the city with us in our decisions.

 

Full Council resolves to ask the Mayor and Cabinet to:

  1. Reassess the addition of preventative skating measures and to instead actively seek to provide central Bristol locations and funding to enable safe skating locations agreeable to all residents.

 

Motion to be moved by: Cllr Ani Stafford-Townsend (Green Group)

Minutes:

Following a short adjournment, it was then moved by the Lord Mayor that standing order CPR2.1(xi) be suspended to allow the meeting to go past the 30 minutes time limit for motions.  Following a vote it was agreed to proceed up until a 60 minute limit for motions and a 9pm finish time for the meeting.

1. Golden Motion - Homelessness and Immigration Rules

 

Councillor Renhard moved the following motion:

 

1. This council notes the Government Immigration Rules published on 22 October 2020, coming into effect on 1 December 2020 which made rough sleeping grounds for refusing or cancelling a person’s leave to remain in the UK.

2. This council further notes the implementation guidance published by the Government on 20 April 2021 which clarifies how the rules will be implemented

3. This council welcomes Bristol’s status as a City of Sanctuary and the work the administration is doing to make Bristol a welcoming place for refugees.

4. This council welcomes the Labour administration’s work to reduce rough sleeping by 80% since 2016.

5. This council welcomes the Labour administration’s introduction of Bristol Street Outreach – a new service to help accelerate the Council’s work to end rough sleeping in Bristol.

6. This council welcomes the government’s ongoing commitment to end rough sleeping by 2024.

This council believes

7. In order to end rough sleeping, people experiencing homelessness must be able to confidently approach local services provided by this council and its commissioned partners.

8. That the immigration rules as proposed will dissuade many people facing homelessness from accessing those services for fear that their details will be passed to immigration authorities and that this will lead to an increase in rough sleeping

This council therefore pledges

9. Subject to the circumstances of each individual case, in order to assist the national effort to end rough sleeping we will make no direct referrals under the rough sleeping Immigration Rules.

10. The council will also not require any of our commissioned partners to make referrals or pass data to the Home Office under the Immigration rules.

11. The council will only share information and data with the Home Office with the explicit and informed consent of the individual.

12. To display this commitment prominently in public areas and on our website and to inform those organisations that we work with (commissioned and non-commissioned) who make referrals to us of this policy.

13. To join Homeless Links’s #SupportDontDeport campaign and allow our logo to be identified with that campaign.

The motion was seconded by Councillor Rippington.

 

Councillor Weston moved the following amendment:

 

‘That the motion be amended to read as follows:

 

1.  This council notes the Government Immigration Rules published on 22 October 2020, coming into effect on 1 December 2020 which made rough sleeping grounds for refusing or cancelling a person’s leave to remain in the UK.

2.  This council further notes the implementation guidance published by the Government on 20 April 2021 which clarifies how the rules will be implemented

3.  This council welcomes Bristol’s status as a City of Sanctuary and the work the administration is doing to make Bristol a welcoming place for refugees.

4.  This council welcomes the Labour administration’s work to reduce rough sleeping by 80% since 2016.

5.  This Council wishes to particularly acknowledge the extra resources and support given by Central Government to provide everyone sleeping rough with safe accommodation during the health crisis.

6.  This council welcomes the Labour administration’s introduction of Bristol Street Outreach – a new service to help accelerate the Council’s work to end rough sleeping in Bristol.

7.  This council welcomes the government’s ongoing commitment to end rough sleeping by 2024.

This council believes

8.  In order to end rough sleeping, people experiencing homelessness must be able to confidently approach local services provided by this council and its commissioned partners.

9. However, any laws, rules or regulations governing this activity must balance compassion and empathy for the individual with the reasonable expectations around enforcement demanded by the public.

10. Accordingly, and as subsequent clarification on these rule changes makes clear, the refusal or cancellation of a migrant’s permission to stay would only be made in exceptional circumstances where that person has repeatedly refused suitable offers of support and/or engaged in persistent anti-social behaviour.

 11. Notwithstanding the above qualification the immigration rules as proposed  could still theoretically dissuade some people facing homelessness from accessing those services for fear that their details will be passed to immigration authorities and that this might occasion an increase in rough sleeping

This council therefore pledges

12. Subject to the circumstances of each individual case, and where the conditions set out in para. 10 have not yet been established, we will not automatically make direct referrals under the rough sleeping Immigration Rules.

 13. Similarly, in the absence of any previous intervention(s) and/or acts of lawlessness the council will also not require any of our commissioned partners to make referrals or pass data to the Home Office under the Immigration rules.

14. To display this commitment prominently in public areas and on our website and to inform those organisations that we work with (commissioned and non-commissioned) who make referrals to us of this policy.

The amendment was seconded by Councillor Quartley

 

Following debate upon being put to the vote, the amendment was LOST (12 For, 49 Against, 0 Abstentions)

 

There was a debate on the substantive motion on the table before the Lord Mayor invited Councillor Renhard, as mover of the original motion to speak.

 

Following final remarks, upon being put to the vote, the original motion was CARRIED (49 For, 0 Against, 12 Abstentions) it was

 

RESOLVED:

 

1. This council notes the Government Immigration Rules published on 22 October 2020, coming into effect on 1 December 2020 which made rough sleeping grounds for refusing or cancelling a person’s leave to remain in the UK.

2. This council further notes the implementation guidance published by the Government on 20 April 2021 which clarifies how the rules will be implemented

3. This council welcomes Bristol’s status as a City of Sanctuary and the work the administration is doing to make Bristol a welcoming place for refugees.

4. This council welcomes the Labour administration’s work to reduce rough sleeping by 80% since 2016.

5. This council welcomes the Labour administration’s introduction of Bristol Street Outreach – a new service to help accelerate the Council’s work to end rough sleeping in Bristol.

6. This council welcomes the government’s ongoing commitment to end rough sleeping by 2024.

This council believes

7. In order to end rough sleeping, people experiencing homelessness must be able to confidently approach local services provided by this council and its commissioned partners.

8. That the immigration rules as proposed will dissuade many people facing homelessness from accessing those services for fear that their details will be passed to immigration authorities and that this will lead to an increase in rough sleeping

This council therefore pledges

9. Subject to the circumstances of each individual case, in order to assist the national effort to end rough sleeping we will make no direct referrals under the rough sleeping Immigration Rules.

10. The council will also not require any of our commissioned partners to make referrals or pass data to the Home Office under the Immigration rules.

11. The council will only share information and data with the Home Office with the explicit and informed consent of the individual.

12. To display this commitment prominently in public areas and on our website and to inform those organisations that we work with (commissioned and non-commissioned) who make referrals to us of this policy.

13. To join Homeless Links’s #SupportDontDeport campaign and allow our logo to be identified with that campaign.

 

 

Silver Motion – LGBT+ Mental Health Protection

 

Councillor Hartley moved the following motion:

 

Full Council notes that:

1. Under the Equalities Act 2010, Bristol City Council has a legal duty to combat discrimination and promote equality.

2. That the Council’s Equality Strategy 2018-2023 establishes the principles that the Council will work “with residents and employers to create communities which are able to come together, value diversity and challenge discrimination”

3. That a 2018 Stonewall Report on health among LGBT+ people states that over half of LGBT+ people (52%) experienced depression in the previous year.

4. The same report states that one in eight LGBT+ people aged 18-24 (13 per cent) said they’ve attempted to take their own life in the previous year.

5. A 2016 Bristol LGBT+ Health & Wellbeing Needs Survey commissioned by Bristol Healthwatch found that 61% of participants had sought help for anxiety or  depression, and that 32% of respondents had hurt or injured themselves in an act of self harm.

6. Gay and Bisexual men are 4 times more likely to attempt suicide across their lifetime than the rest of the population.

7. Black, Asian or Minority Ethnic (BAME) LGBT+ face additional barriers, with 18% experiencing difficulties trying to access healthcare services, and 62% experience depression.

8. Young LGBT+ persons are particularly affected, with data from the Queer Futures 2016 study stating that over 70% of young LGBT+ people experienced discrimination, bullying, rejection, physical and verbal violence, threats and/or other forms of marginalisation related to their sexual orientation and gender identity.

9. Older LGBT+ people also face discrimination or choose to re-enter the closet when, for example, accessing heath and care provision in older age.

10. One in seven LGBT+ people (14 per cent) avoid seeking healthcare for fear of discrimination from staff.

11. Almost one in four LGBT+ people (23 per cent) have witnessed discriminatory or negative remarks against LGBT+ people by healthcare staff. In the last year alone, six per cent of LGBT+ people – including 20 per cent of trans people – have witnessed these remarks.

12. These trends are often more marked in the experiences of trans people.

13. The pandemic has likely made it more difficult for LGBT+ people to have access to mental health support, who may have been trapped in circumstances where they have been unable to fully express themselves.

Full Council believes:

1.    In the equality of all people regardless of their sexual orientation or gender identity.

2. That mental health treatment should have parity with physical health treatment.

3. That greater support is required for LGBT+ people suffering from mental health conditions than they are currently receiving.

Full Council resolves to:

1. Ask the Head of Equality & Inclusion to ensure that within the Council itself, a robust set of processes are created through our staff led groups and trade unions to protect the mental health of LGBT+ council staff.

2. Carry out a survey of Bristol LGBT+ residents to assess the current issues around health within the LGBT+ Community, similar to the 2016 Bristol LGBT+ Health & Wellbeing Needs Survey

3. Work with our partners across the city, other Equalities Charter signatories, and the large range of LGBT+ charities working within mental health across Bristol to create a strategic plan for improving the mental health of the LGBT+ community.

4. Work with local charities and our city partners promote services available to LGBT+ persons for assistance with their mental health.

5. Ask the Cabinet Member for Education to write to all the governing bodies, proprietors (of academy chains), headteachers and principals of every school across the city to offer the Council’s support in delivering greater levels of LGBT+ mental health support in our schools.

The motion was seconded by Councillor Craig.

 

Following debate, upon being put to the vote, the original motion was CARRIED and it was

 

RESOLVED:

 

Full Council notes that:

1. Under the Equalities Act 2010, Bristol City Council has a legal duty to combat discrimination and promote equality.

2. That the Council’s Equality Strategy 2018-2023 establishes the principles that the Council will work “with residents and employers to create communities which are able to come together, value diversity and challenge discrimination”

3. That a 2018 Stonewall Report on health among LGBT+ people states that over half of LGBT+ people (52%) experienced depression in the previous year.

4. The same report states that one in eight LGBT+ people aged 18-24 (13 per cent) said they’ve attempted to take their own life in the previous year.

5. A 2016 Bristol LGBT+ Health & Wellbeing Needs Survey commissioned by Bristol Healthwatch found that 61% of participants had sought help for anxiety or  depression, and that 32% of respondents had hurt or injured themselves in an act of self harm.

6. Gay and Bisexual men are 4 times more likely to attempt suicide across their lifetime than the rest of the population.

7. Black, Asian or Minority Ethnic (BAME) LGBT+ face additional barriers, with 18% experiencing difficulties trying to access healthcare services, and 62% experience depression.

8. Young LGBT+ persons are particularly affected, with data from the Queer Futures 2016 study stating that over 70% of young LGBT+ people experienced discrimination, bullying, rejection, physical and verbal violence, threats and/or other forms of marginalisation related to their sexual orientation and gender identity.

9. Older LGBT+ people also face discrimination or choose to re-enter the closet when, for example, accessing heath and care provision in older age.

10. One in seven LGBT+ people (14 per cent) avoid seeking healthcare for fear of discrimination from staff.

11. Almost one in four LGBT+ people (23 per cent) have witnessed discriminatory or negative remarks against LGBT+ people by healthcare staff. In the last year alone, six per cent of LGBT+ people – including 20 per cent of trans people – have witnessed these remarks.

12. These trends are often more marked in the experiences of trans people.

13. The pandemic has likely made it more difficult for LGBT+ people to have access to mental health support, who may have been trapped in circumstances where they have been unable to fully express themselves.

Full Council believes:

2.    In the equality of all people regardless of their sexual orientation or gender identity.

2. That mental health treatment should have parity with physical health treatment.

3. That greater support is required for LGBT+ people suffering from mental health conditions than they are currently receiving.

Full Council resolves to:

1. Ask the Head of Equality & Inclusion to ensure that within the Council itself, a robust set of processes are created through our staff led groups and trade unions to protect the mental health of LGBT+ council staff.

2. Carry out a survey of Bristol LGBT+ residents to assess the current issues around health within the LGBT+ Community, similar to the 2016 Bristol LGBT+ Health & Wellbeing Needs Survey

3. Work with our partners across the city, other Equalities Charter signatories, and the large range of LGBT+ charities working within mental health across Bristol to create a strategic plan for improving the mental health of the LGBT+ community.

4. Work with local charities and our city partners promote services available to LGBT+ persons for assistance with their mental health.

5. Ask the Cabinet Member for Education to write to all the governing bodies, proprietors (of academy chains), headteachers and principals of every school across the city to offer the Council’s support in delivering greater levels of LGBT+ mental health support in our schools.

 

 

Supporting documents: